Jungianthology Podcast Posts

with Lionel Corbett, MD & Cathy Rives, MD

This episode is the first session of the series Jungian Psychology & Kohut’s Self-Psychology.

The psychoanalytic methods of self psychology as developed by Heinz Kohut examine the development and the developmental disturbances of self-esteem and confidence, the formation and malformation of guiding ideals, empathy for the thoughts and feelings of others, initiative and creativity, and even sense of humor and wisdom. Lionel Corbett and Cathy Rives compare and contrast Jung’s theory of the Self, as well as general aspects of Jungian psychology, with Kohut’s self psychology, which is rapidly becoming a mainstream alternative to both classical psychoanalytic drive theory and ego psychology. They also utilize case studies, as well as fairytale and myth analysis, to help illustrate these theories. It was recorded in 1989.

Lionel Corbett, MD is a professor of depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. His primary interests are: the religious function of the psyche, especially the way in which personal religious experience is relevant to individual psychology; the development of psychotherapy as a spiritual practice; and the interface of Jungian psychology and contemporary psychoanalytic thought. He is the author of numerous professional papers and four books: Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond ReligionThe Religious Function of the PsycheThe Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a spiritual practice, and most recently The Soul in Anguish: Psychotherapeutic approaches to suffering.

Cathy Rives, MD is a psychiatrist, Jungian Analyst, and Chair of the Clinical Psychology Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is particularly interested in Jungian developmental theory, a way of working analytically that integrates Jungian theory, Object Relations, and Self Psychology. She is also pursuing a new field of study, the law, motivated by a desire to participate more effectively in the field of non-human animal rights.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Corbett, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Rives, click here.


© 1989 Lionel Corbett & Cathy Rives. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW.

We are rebroadcasting this episode because it inexplicably disappeared from our iTunes feed.

The work of C.G. Jung offers thoughtful clinicians useful, practical insights into the emotional lives of clients.  Yet much of his work remains unknown to many clinicians. The “Jung 101” series, which began with this lecture on September 18, 2015, introduces Jung’s key concepts. In this lecture, Boris Matthews will present Jung’s concept of individuation, explaining why it was so important to Jung and how it applies in today’s clinical setting.

Boris Matthews, PhD graduated from the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, and maintains a practice of analytical psychology in the Milwaukee and Madison, WI, areas. He is particularly interested in working with persons who recognize need to develop a balanced adaptation to the “outside” and to the “inside” worlds, work that involves awareness of the individual’s psychological typology. Dreams, active imagination, and spiritual concerns are integral elements in the analytic work, the ultimate goal of which is to develop a functioning dialog with the non-ego center, the Self. He serves on the faculty and various committees of the Institute, regularly teaches classes for analytic candidates, and conducts study groups in Madison as well as by video conference.

PowerPoint: The slides for this talk are available HERE


Also by Boris Matthews:
The Archetypal Weather Report and How to Deal with It

Related talks include:
The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation
Individuation in Later Life and the Return of the Inner Child
Analysis and Individuation
A New Model of Psychological Types


©  2015 Boris Matthews. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Episode music is by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the series Christian Shamanism: Visions of Nikolas of Flue.

A shaman is a person who has been forced by fate to take an inner, awe-filled journey which ultimately gives a new form to the person and to the culture. This journey demands sacrifice, isolation from the collective’s expectations, and a particular form of courage which is able to accept new forms of awareness and new forms of the divine.

Every religious tradition has stories of persons who have walked the “shamanic path.” Some religious traditions have called shamans by different names: sage, saint, and Bodhisattva are but a few of these names. There is also the little-discussed Christian shamanic tradition in which C.G. Jung stands, both as a visionary and as a healer of souls. This course uses the writings of C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz as a basis for discussing the role of the shaman in general and the Christian shaman in particular. It was recorded in 1994.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1994 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Jungian Psychology and Human Spirituality: Liberation from Tribalism in Religious Life. It was recorded in 1989.

In this seminar, Dr. Moore stresses that “although it is important that people find and affirm their common human spiritual roots, it is time to realize that tribalism in human culture, politics, and religion must be transcended. Jungian thought may be a vehicle to assist in facilitating that process.”

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE.

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© 1989 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Anthony Stevens, MD

This episode is part one of the series The Archetypal Realities of Everyday Life. It was recorded in 1986.

This seminar examines the ways in which the archetypes of the collective unconscious guide, form, and vitalize our daily existence. We can perceive this archetypal influence subjectively in consciousness and objectively in art and literature.  As Jung wrote: “The impact of an archetype, whether it takes the form of an immediate experience or is expressed through the spoken word, stirs us because it summons up a voice that is stronger than our own”. In this seminar works of art from pre-historic times up to the present are examined to see how they both express for us and evoke in us the fundamental archetypes of the human experience.

NOTE: We do not have the images that were used in this seminar, though we know one of them is Hans Holbein’s painting The Ambassadors (below).

The Ambassadors

Anthony Stevens, MD holds degrees in medicine and psychology from Oxford University and a diploma in psychological medicine from the Royal College of Physicians. A frequent lecturer at the Jung Institutes of London and Zürich, he has also given presentations at the Los Angeles and San Francisco Institutes. Dr. Stevens is author of Jung: A Very Short IntroductionArchetypes: A Natural History of the Self, The Story of Withymead: A Jungian Community for the Healing Arts, and Ariadne’s Clue: A Guide to the Symbols of Humankind.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.

Support Us:     


© 1986 Anthony Stevens. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law