Category: The Collective Unconscious

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the series Christian Shamanism: Visions of Nikolas of Flue.

A shaman is a person who has been forced by fate to take an inner, awe-filled journey which ultimately gives a new form to the person and to the culture. This journey demands sacrifice, isolation from the collective’s expectations, and a particular form of courage which is able to accept new forms of awareness and new forms of the divine.

Every religious tradition has stories of persons who have walked the “shamanic path.” Some religious traditions have called shamans by different names: sage, saint, and Bodhisattva are but a few of these names. There is also the little-discussed Christian shamanic tradition in which C.G. Jung stands, both as a visionary and as a healer of souls. This course uses the writings of C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz as a basis for discussing the role of the shaman in general and the Christian shaman in particular. It was recorded in 1994.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1994 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Jungian Psychology and Human Spirituality: Liberation from Tribalism in Religious Life. It was recorded in 1989.

In this seminar, Dr. Moore stresses that “although it is important that people find and affirm their common human spiritual roots, it is time to realize that tribalism in human culture, politics, and religion must be transcended. Jungian thought may be a vehicle to assist in facilitating that process.”

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE.

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© 1989 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

582imagewith Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myths to Grow By. In his later years, Joseph Campbell defined mythology as a system of energy-evoking and energy-directing symbols which serve four functions for individuals and for the culture: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and developmental functions. This course addresses the personal development aspects of mythological systems, using the writings of Joseph Campbell and others as a guide. Seen in their developmental function, myths are blueprints or road maps to personal growth. To know our own personal myth is to be filled with energy and progressive visions of an attainable goal. To know the myths of a culture is to know the path out the Wasteland. Myths are Daedalus-wings, allowing us to fly out of the labyrinthine pain of our own narrowness. This course explores mythological images and patterns as maps to personal and cultural development. It was recorded in 1995.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1995 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman