Category: Self and Self-Psychology

with Lionel Corbett, MD & Cathy Rives, MD

This episode is the first session of the series Jungian Psychology & Kohut’s Self-Psychology.

The psychoanalytic methods of self psychology as developed by Heinz Kohut examine the development and the developmental disturbances of self-esteem and confidence, the formation and malformation of guiding ideals, empathy for the thoughts and feelings of others, initiative and creativity, and even sense of humor and wisdom. Lionel Corbett and Cathy Rives compare and contrast Jung’s theory of the Self, as well as general aspects of Jungian psychology, with Kohut’s self psychology, which is rapidly becoming a mainstream alternative to both classical psychoanalytic drive theory and ego psychology. They also utilize case studies, as well as fairytale and myth analysis, to help illustrate these theories. It was recorded in 1989.

Lionel Corbett, MD is a professor of depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. His primary interests are: the religious function of the psyche, especially the way in which personal religious experience is relevant to individual psychology; the development of psychotherapy as a spiritual practice; and the interface of Jungian psychology and contemporary psychoanalytic thought. He is the author of numerous professional papers and four books: Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond ReligionThe Religious Function of the PsycheThe Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a spiritual practice, and most recently The Soul in Anguish: Psychotherapeutic approaches to suffering.

Cathy Rives, MD is a psychiatrist, Jungian Analyst, and Chair of the Clinical Psychology Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is particularly interested in Jungian developmental theory, a way of working analytically that integrates Jungian theory, Object Relations, and Self Psychology. She is also pursuing a new field of study, the law, motivated by a desire to participate more effectively in the field of non-human animal rights.

For the complete series, click here.
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For more seminars by Dr. Rives, click here.


© 1989 Lionel Corbett & Cathy Rives. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Anthony Stevens, MD

This episode is part one of the series The Archetypal Realities of Everyday Life. It was recorded in 1986.

This seminar examines the ways in which the archetypes of the collective unconscious guide, form, and vitalize our daily existence. We can perceive this archetypal influence subjectively in consciousness and objectively in art and literature.  As Jung wrote: “The impact of an archetype, whether it takes the form of an immediate experience or is expressed through the spoken word, stirs us because it summons up a voice that is stronger than our own”. In this seminar works of art from pre-historic times up to the present are examined to see how they both express for us and evoke in us the fundamental archetypes of the human experience.

NOTE: We do not have the images that were used in this seminar, though we know one of them is Hans Holbein’s painting The Ambassadors (below).

The Ambassadors

Anthony Stevens, MD holds degrees in medicine and psychology from Oxford University and a diploma in psychological medicine from the Royal College of Physicians. A frequent lecturer at the Jung Institutes of London and Zürich, he has also given presentations at the Los Angeles and San Francisco Institutes. Dr. Stevens is author of Jung: A Very Short IntroductionArchetypes: A Natural History of the Self, The Story of Withymead: A Jungian Community for the Healing Arts, and Ariadne’s Clue: A Guide to the Symbols of Humankind.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.

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© 1986 Anthony Stevens. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with David Rosen, MD

This episode is part one of the series Transforming Depression Through Symbolic Death and New Life: A Jungian Approach to Using the Creative Arts.

While working extensively with patients suffering from depression, Jungian analyst and psychiatrist David Rosen uncovered helpful clues to understanding this widespread malady. When people feel grief and despair or suffer from suicidal thoughts, they may feel like they are dying inside. In order to regain the will to live, Rosen believes, only a part of them – a false self – needs to die. When the false self is permitted to die symbolically (egocide) through drawing, pottery, writing, or other forms of creative expression, a kind of mourning process is set in motion. When the cycle comes to an end, the person is transformed and experiences new life, a rebirth of purpose and meaning. This workshop focuses on understanding depression and the quest for meaning, discerning the creative potential of suicide, and recognizing and treating depression and suicidal people. Crisis points such as adolescence, mid-life, divorce, and loss of a loved one are discussed. Drawing from actual case material, Dr. Rosen presents the egocide and transformation model, explains how it is applied and how it works, and explores its creative potential. It was recorded in 1994.

rosen_davidDavid Rosen, MD is a Jungian analyst and psychiatrist in College Station, Texas. He is a McMillan Professor of analytical psychology, professor of psychiatry and behavioral science, and professor of humanities in medicine at Texas A&M University. He is the author of four books, including Transforming Depression: A Jungian Approach to Using the Creative Arts.

For the complete series, click here.

For books by Dr. Rosen, click here.


© 1994 David Rosen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

with Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW

This episode is part one of the series Terror, Evil, and Loss of the Self. In this seminar, Brenda Donahue discusses how survivors of childhood deprivation or physical and sexual abuse routinely describe themselves as freaks, existing outside of normal human relations because they feel evil or bad. This is because the child victim takes the evil of the abuser into him/herself in order to preserve the primary attachment to the parents. This sense of badness or evil becomes a staple of the personality structure, and many survivors spend their lives refusing to be absolved of blame. This course presents basic concepts from analytical psychology and shows how they can be useful in the treatment of post-traumatic stress syndrome. It was recorded in 1994.

Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW is a Jungian analyst in private practice in the western suburbs of Chicago and author of C. G. Jung’s Complex Dynamics and the Clinical Relationship: One Map for Mystery.

For the complete series, click here.

Creative Commons License
© 1994 Brenda Donahue. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman