Category: Individuation

with Anthony Stevens, MD

This episode is part one of the series The Archetypal Realities of Everyday Life. It was recorded in 1986.

This seminar examines the ways in which the archetypes of the collective unconscious guide, form, and vitalize our daily existence. We can perceive this archetypal influence subjectively in consciousness and objectively in art and literature.  As Jung wrote: “The impact of an archetype, whether it takes the form of an immediate experience or is expressed through the spoken word, stirs us because it summons up a voice that is stronger than our own”. In this seminar works of art from pre-historic times up to the present are examined to see how they both express for us and evoke in us the fundamental archetypes of the human experience.

NOTE: We do not have the images that were used in this seminar, though we know one of them is Hans Holbein’s painting The Ambassadors (below).

The Ambassadors

Anthony Stevens, MD holds degrees in medicine and psychology from Oxford University and a diploma in psychological medicine from the Royal College of Physicians. A frequent lecturer at the Jung Institutes of London and Zürich, he has also given presentations at the Los Angeles and San Francisco Institutes. Dr. Stevens is author of Jung: A Very Short IntroductionArchetypes: A Natural History of the Self, The Story of Withymead: A Jungian Community for the Healing Arts, and Ariadne’s Clue: A Guide to the Symbols of Humankind.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.

Support Us:     


© 1986 Anthony Stevens. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series Jung’s Commentary on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola.

Using as a focal point Jung’s private notes from his 1939–1940 lectures on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, Dr. Thomas Patrick Lavin discusses the role of imaginal work in the quest for spiritual and psychological growth. The Spiritual Exercises is viewed as an initiation rite in which a Christian form of active imagination is presented. It was recorded in 1988.

The series is divided into the follow four topics:

  1. Seeing Jung and Ignatius in Their Historical Contexts
  2. Active Imagination and the Ignatian Methods of Prayer
  3. The Anima Christi and the Fundamentum
  4. Ignatius the Psychologist and Jung the Theologian

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1988 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

582imagewith Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myths to Grow By. In his later years, Joseph Campbell defined mythology as a system of energy-evoking and energy-directing symbols which serve four functions for individuals and for the culture: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and developmental functions. This course addresses the personal development aspects of mythological systems, using the writings of Joseph Campbell and others as a guide. Seen in their developmental function, myths are blueprints or road maps to personal growth. To know our own personal myth is to be filled with energy and progressive visions of an attainable goal. To know the myths of a culture is to know the path out the Wasteland. Myths are Daedalus-wings, allowing us to fly out of the labyrinthine pain of our own narrowness. This course explores mythological images and patterns as maps to personal and cultural development. It was recorded in 1995.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1995 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman