Category: Individuation

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

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© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

582imagewith Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myths to Grow By. In his later years, Joseph Campbell defined mythology as a system of energy-evoking and energy-directing symbols which serve four functions for individuals and for the culture: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and developmental functions. This course addresses the personal development aspects of mythological systems, using the writings of Joseph Campbell and others as a guide. Seen in their developmental function, myths are blueprints or road maps to personal growth. To know our own personal myth is to be filled with energy and progressive visions of an attainable goal. To know the myths of a culture is to know the path out the Wasteland. Myths are Daedalus-wings, allowing us to fly out of the labyrinthine pain of our own narrowness. This course explores mythological images and patterns as maps to personal and cultural development. It was recorded in 1995.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1995 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

with Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW.

The work of C.G. Jung offers thoughtful clinicians useful, practical insights into the emotional lives of clients.  Yet much of his work remains unknown to many clinicians.  The “Getting to Know Jung” series, which began with this lecture on September 18, 2015, introduces Jung’s key concepts. In this lecture, Boris Matthews will present Jung’s concept of individuation, explaining why it was so important to Jung and how it applies in today’s clinical setting.

matthews_borisBoris Matthews, PhD graduated from the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, and maintains a practice of analytical psychology in the Milwaukee and Madison, WI, areas. He is particularly interested in working with persons who recognize need to develop a balanced adaptation to the “outside” and to the “inside” worlds, work that involves awareness of the individual’s psychological typology. Dreams, active imagination, and spiritual concerns are integral elements in the analytic work, the ultimate goal of which is to develop a functioning dialog with the non-ego center, the Self. He serves on the faculty and various committees of the Institute, regularly teaches classes for analytic candidates, and conducts study groups in Madison as well as by video conference.

PowerPoint: The slides for this talk are available HERE (right-click and click “Save Link As…” to download)

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Related talks include:
The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation
Individuation in Later Life and the Return of the Inner Child
Analysis and Individuation

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©  Boris Matthews. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

714imageConcentrated Wisdom for Juicy Women and Exceptional Men with Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D.

To be a crone is not a matter of age or appearance. Becoming  a “crone” is a crowning inner achievement. “Crones Don’t Whine” is the first of thirteen defining qualities of the crone because whining blocks spiritual and psychological development. Crone qualities are those that can be taken to heart and cultivated throughout life; they support authenticity, integrity, soul growth and social activism. While physiology and socialization make it more difficult for most men to develop crone qualities, exceptional men can become crones. Crone development comes through connecting deeply with others and with soul qualities in ourselves. Maturity, wisdom, and compassion develop over time through love and reflection; they are the fruits of consciousness and choice.

bolen-jean-shinodaJean Shinoda Bolen, M.D. is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women and of the International Transpersonal Association. She was a recipient of the Institute for Health and Healing’s “Pioneers in Art, Science, and the Soul of Healing Award” and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

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©  Jean Shinoda Bolen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

Singer-June1The Practice of Jung’s Psychology
with June Singer, Ph.D.

In this talk June Singer gives an overview of Jungian Psychology, describes how the Jungian relationship to the unconscious differs from other forms of depth psychology, a goes on to discuss archetypal theory, typology, and the ego-Self axis. This talk also includes a question and answer session. Note: During her response to a question, there is a 5-second gap in audio while the cassette was changed.

June Singer, Ph.D. was a major figure in the development of the Jungian movement in the United States.  She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology from Northwestern University and completed training as a Jungian analyst in Zurich, Switzerland.  During the 1960′s, Dr. Singer founded the Analytical Psychology Club of Chicago, which eventually became the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, in order to provide interested individuals an opportunity to study the works of Carl Jung. June Singer was a gifted analyst and a distinguished author and lecturer.  Her text, Boundaries of the Soul, is considered to be one of the best introductions to Jungian thought. She also wrote two books about sexuality, and a Jungian study of the poet William Blake.

There is no commentary for this lecture.

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© June Singer. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Marriage, life’s greatest intimacy, paradoxically delivers both wounding and healing and challenges to the full our capacities for self-acceptance and self-giving. In this lecture, Dr. Stein examines the mysteries and dynamics of married life.

stein_murrayMurray Stein, Ph.D. is a training analyst at the International School for Analytical Psychology in Zurich, Switzerland. His most recent publications include The Principle of Individuation, Jung’s Map of the Soul, and The Edinburgh International Encyclopaedia of Psychoanalysis (Editor of the Jungian sections, with Ross Skelton as General Editor). He lectures internationally on topics related to Analytical Psychology and its applications in the contemporary world. Dr. Stein is a graduate of Yale University (B.A. and M.Div.), the University of Chicago (Ph.D., in Religion and Psychological Studies), and the C.G. Jung Institut-Zurich. He is a founding member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. He has been the president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (2001-4), and is presently a member of the Swiss Society for Analytical Psychology and President of the International School of Analytical Psychology, Zurich.

Commentary is by Peter Demuth, Psy.D., Jungian Analyst and member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts in private practice in Evanston, IL. More information about Dr. Demuth can be found at demuthpsychologicalservices.com

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© 1981 Murray Stein. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.