Category: Topics

with John Giannini, MDiv, LCPC, NCPsyA

This episode is part one of the series Understanding and Healing Addictions: A Jungian Contribution. It was recorded in 1990.

This course offers a Jungian understanding and healing of addictions by considering the correspondence between Bill Wilson, co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, and Carl Jung, whom Wilson praises for being one of the key influences leading to the formation of AA and its 12 Steps. The meaning of addiction within our culture is also examined by utilizing the psychology of narcissism as a key to understanding.

Diagrams used in this talk are not available, but in-depth descriptions of John’s work can be found in his book, Compass of the Soul.

John Giannini, MDiv, LCPC, NCPsyA was a Jungian analyst in private practice in Chicago and Evanston. He holds an MDiv in Religion and Psychology from St. Albert’s College, an MA from the University of Chicago Divinity School, an MBA from Stanford University, and LCPC certification with the State of Illinois. John published articles and lectured widely throughout the U.S. and Canada on the wounded child within and narcissistic/addictive behavior. He is the author of Compass of the Soul, an updated understanding of typology.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.
For all of John Giannini’s lectures, CLICK HERE.

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© 1990 John Giannini. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myth and Psyche: An Introduction to Jungian Perspectives on Human Mythology. It was recorded in 1992.

According to Jung, myth-making is a natural and impersonal potential present in the collective unconscious of all peoples throughout all times. Drawing on the contributions of Jung, Campbell, and Eliade, this course explores the role of myth in human life. Five of the major mythological themes prominent in world mythology are examined in terms of their contemporary psychological and cultural significance:

  1. Mythology of Creation
  2. Mythology of The Divine Child
  3. Mythology of The Hero
  4. Mythology of The Shaman
  5. Mythology of The Apocalypse

This episode is the introductory session for the series, titled “Mythology and Psychology: A Jungian Perspective”.

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE.

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© 1992 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first part of the series The Way of the Sly One: The Psychology of Our Possible Evolution in the Writings of Gurdjieff, Ouspensky, & Jung.

Most depth psychological theories look backward into the personal history of the individual in order to find the causes for neurotic symptoms, gain insight into their persistence in the present, and diminish their effects in the future. A key feature of Jungian psychology is the addition of a forward focus, a constructive, teleological emphasis on the meaning of symptoms, and the need to discover what the symptom is calling the sufferer to notice and change. This places Jung in a category of psychological practitioners who seek to promote the possible evolution of the person from present status to future transcendence.

Russian spiritual teacher G.I. Gurdjieff sought to bring his students to a place of consciousness that went far beyond what was generally thought of as “being awake”. The core of his teaching, that humankind was unfinished and did not possess a soul but was capable of creating one through intense inner work, created discomfort in his followers and stimulated them to find ways to break through to new levels of awareness – a method he called “the way of the sly one”. P.D. Ouspensky, Gurdjieff’s foremost disciple, also taught about the possible evolution of human consciousness and provided a more systematized interpretation of Gurdjieff’s teachings.

Ken James, PhD maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois.  His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, and ways to sustain the vital relationship between body, mind and spirit.  He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy, the Kabbalah, spirituality and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with June Singer and other Analysts

As we enter a new year, it seems right to share the recording of the program “The Fate of Depth Psychology in the New Millenium”, held in 1998. It includes introductory remarks by June Singer and a lengthy discussion with panel and audience members. We hope this event will facilitate reflection as we enter 2018. From the original CD jacket:

“As we approach the year 2000 humanity finds itself, as it always will, wrestling with the eternal questions of the meaning of existence and their relationship to spirit and matter. Given the direction of contemporary brain research and science, the growing psychopharmacological approach to mental and emotional disorders, the emergence of managed care, and the economics of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, we have to wonder what challenges depth psychology will face in the years ahead.

This program takes up this critical question as seven Jungian analysts share their individual visions of the fate that awaits depth psychology in the new millennium. The panel members each present a brief synopsis of his/her vision and then engage with the audience in a lively discussion of their ideas, reactions, and intuitions.”

Singer-June1June Singer, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world. She is the author of many books, including Modern Woman in Search of Soul: A Jungian Guide to the Visible and Invisible WorldsAndrogyny: The Opposites WithinThe Unholy Bible: Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious, and Boundaries of the Soul: The Practice of Jung’s Psychology.


For more seminars by June Singer, click here.
For books by June Singer, click here.


© 1998. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

with Jean Shinoda Bolen, MD

This episode is the first part of the series Women’s Mysteries: Sources of Creativity, Religion & Spirituality, & Solace.

Jungian analyst and author Jean Shinoda Bolen leads a workshop for women “who seek to nurture their own creative and spiritual yearnings and find ways of expressing, articulating, and valuing what grows out of their inner life and the life they have lived so far. In the company of other women who know that suffering and joy and life are linked, personas drop away and soul comes forth.” Bolen weaves stories of psyche and goddess that have the power to touch themes and sacred places in the soul, and she leads listeners through a guided meditation, allowing the opportunity for personal symbols and myths to emerge. This tape set is also intended to serve as a model for women interested in forming their own spiritual groups. It was recorded in 1994.

bolen-jean-shinodaJean Shinoda Bolen, MD is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women and of the International Transpersonal Association. She was a recipient of the Institute for Health and Healing’s “Pioneers in Art, Science, and the Soul of Healing Award” and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She is the author of The Tao of Psychology, Goddesses in Everywoman, Gods in Everyman, Ring of Power, Crossing to Avalon, Close to the Bone, The Millionth Circle, Goddesses in Older Women, Crones Don’t Whine, Urgent Message from Mother, and Like a Tree with over eighty foreign translations.


Links
The Complete Series

All Lectures by Jean Shinoda Bolen 


© 1994 Jean Shinoda Bolen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law