Tag: Gender

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

with June Singer, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Jungians Speak About Jungian Women.

Women’s contributions have been central to the development of Jung’s analytical psychology from its inception to the present. Their contributions include direct collaborations with Jung, amplification and interpretation of his ideas and original theoretical contributions to the field.

This special program includes lectures and discussion to explore the life, work, and influence of six Jungian women who have contributed significantly to the history of analytical psychology. The speakers are practicing analysts who talk about the ways in which these women have personally affected their own psychological and spiritual development and their work with clients. Through personal reflections and reminiscence of the speakers, listeners will come to know and appreciate the contributions of a wide range of Jungian women to the theory and practice of analytical psychology. It was recorded in 2001.

Topics and speakers included in Jungians Speak About Jungian Women are:

  1. The First Generation by June Singer
  2. Esther Harding by Mary Dougherty
  3. Helen Luke by Carol Donnelly
  4. Emma Jung by Carole Sorg
  5. Toni Wolf by Sue G. Rosenthal
  6. Marie-Louise Von Franz by Judy Shaw
  7. June Singer by Murray Stein

Singer-June1June Singer, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world. She is the author of many books, including Modern Woman in Search of Soul: A Jungian Guide to the Visible and Invisible WorldsAndrogyny: The Opposites WithinThe Unholy Bible: Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious, and Boundaries of the Soul: The Practice of Jung’s Psychology.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Singer, click here.
For books by Dr. Singer, click here.


© 2001 June Singer. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

with John Beebe, MD.

In this lecture, Dr. Beebe explores a neglected area in analytical psychology, the influence of the father’s unconscious upon the later development of the son. Jung’s analytical psychology offers insight into the way a father’s feminine side influences the formation of the anima of the son. It was recorded on February 2nd, 1984 and includes the original introduction by Murray Stein.

beebejohnJohn Beebe, MD a physician specializing in psychotherapy, is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. He is the author of Integrity in Depth, editor of C. G. Jung’s Aspects of the Masculine, and co-author of The Presence of the Feminine in Film. He is the founding editor of The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal (now titled Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche), and a was the first American co-editor of the London-based Journal of Analytical Psychology. An international lecturer is widely known for his work on psychological types, the psychology of moral process, and the Jungian understanding of film. Recently he has been engaged in training the first generation of analytical psychologists in China.

Audio issue: The microphone in the original event was too sensitive, which caused loud distortions when the speaker got too close to it. We have done what we can to make those less obtrusive, but you will still hear them.

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Other talks by John Beebe:
A New Model of Psychological Types
The Conscience of the Post-Modern Artist

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©  John Beebe. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

with Karin Lofthus Carrington, MA, MFT.

Caroline Stevens, Jungian analyst and wise woman of our Jungian community, introduces Karin Carrington, psychotherapist, author, and teacher who shares her reflections and understandings about “same sex love” and “women loving women.”

This presentation on same sex love was a groundbreaking event in February 23, 1991.  Karen thanked the Jung Institute for its sponsorship of this historical event during these years of struggle to achieve legal and cultural rights for gay and lesbian people. I think it is safe to say that Karin’s presentation raised the consciousness of many in the audience concerning same sex love.

Karin situates her comments within the political struggle for lesbian and gay rights at that time.  In her presentation, she calls for a restorative analytic theory based in a deep understanding of what it means to love a member of one’s own gender for our selves and for the collective.

Karen quotes an early comment by Jung that homosexuality should not be the concern of legal authority – that persons loving people of their own sex should not be outside of the law.  She also examines the impact of Jung’s theory of contra-sexuality as well as the work of Robert Hopcke on the subject of same sex love and of Christine Downing on women loving women.

Finally, Karin opens the discussion to include questions about what is our true erotic nature as well as questions that explore the over-valuation of separation and the symbolic quest of the hero within current cultural values.

Karin Lofthus Carrington is a psychotherapist, consultant, writer, and teacher whose work focuses on the interrelationship of psychology, spirituality, and social conscience. She has authored and edited books on this topic including Same-Sex Love and The Path to Wholeness.

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Related talks include:
Views of the Animus
The Eroticization of Logos in Modern Times
Civilization in Transition: Jung’s Challenge to Culture in Crisis
Gold in Dark Places: Shadow Work in the Struggle for Self-hood
The Adventure of Being Human & Living, Loving in the Human Realm

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©  Karin Lofthus Carrington. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

714imagewith Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D.

To be a crone is not a matter of age or appearance. Becoming  a “crone” is a crowning inner achievement. “Crones Don’t Whine” is the first of thirteen defining qualities of the crone because whining blocks spiritual and psychological development. Crone qualities are those that can be taken to heart and cultivated throughout life; they support authenticity, integrity, soul growth and social activism. While physiology and socialization make it more difficult for most men to develop crone qualities, exceptional men can become crones. Crone development comes through connecting deeply with others and with soul qualities in ourselves. Maturity, wisdom, and compassion develop over time through love and reflection; they are the fruits of consciousness and choice.

bolen-jean-shinodaJean Shinoda Bolen, M.D. is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women and of the International Transpersonal Association. She was a recipient of the Institute for Health and Healing’s “Pioneers in Art, Science, and the Soul of Healing Award” and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She is the author of The Tao of Psychology, Goddesses in Everywoman, Gods in Everyman, Ring of Power, Crossing to Avalon, Close to the Bone, The Millionth Circle, Goddesses in Older Women, Crones Don’t Whine, Urgent Message from Mother, and Like a Tree with over eighty foreign translations.

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For more by Jean Shinoda Bolen, CLICK HERE.

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©  Jean Shinoda Bolen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

591image Therapeutic Process as Return and (Re-) Emergence with Sylvia Brinton Perera, MA, Jungian Analyst

Just as earth is source, support, and home to humankind, so the mother’s body is source, support, and home of each infant. When the individual’s primal bond is scarred by basic faults, therapy often involves the female analysand’s falling through the painful wounds of the personal mother complex to meet the archetypal energies and images in deep therapeutic regression. This manifests initially through psychoidal phenomena, intense emotions, and the transferential dynamics of the therapeutic field. Sometimes expressed as shape-shifting images of the body/Self, which are similar to images of the goddess of nature revered since Neolithic times, the regression can enable reconnection to the healing feminine depths and the emergence of a more secure and authentic ego.

Sylvia Brinton Perera, MA, is a Jungian analyst who lives, practices, writes, and teaches in New York and Vermont. On the faculty and board of the Jung Institute of New York, she lectures and leads workshops internationally. Her publications include Descent to the Goddess: A Way of Initiation for Women; The Scapegoat Complex: Towards a Mythology of Shadow and Guilt; Dreams, A Portal to the Source (with E. Christopher Whitmont); Celtic Queen Maeve and Addiction: An Archetypal Perspective; and The Irish Bull God: Image of Multiform and Integral Masculinity.

Commentary is by Peter Demuth, Psy.D., Jungian Analyst and member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts in private practice in Evanston, IL. More information about Dr. Demuth can be found at demuthpsychologicalservices.com

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For more by Silvia Perera, Click Here

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© 1996 Sylvia Brinton Perera. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it. 

Music by Michael Chapman

with Marion Woodman155jpeg

Toronto analyst Marion Woodman explores the body/spirit relationship, the withdrawing of projection, gender issues, and the surrender of the ego to the Self as these themes relate to personal transformation.

woodman-marionMarion Woodman (born August 15, 1928) is a Canadian mythopoetic author and women’s movement figure. She is a Jungian analyst trained at the C. G. Jung Institute in ZürichSwitzerland. She is one of the most widely read authors on feminine psychology, focusing on psyche and soma. She is also an international lecturer and poet. Woodman is author of Addiction to Perfection and The Ravaged Bridegroom. (from Wikipedia)

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For more lectures by Marion Woodman, click here.

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© 1984 Marion Woodman. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Edited by Ben Law