Tag: Individuation

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series Jung’s Commentary on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola.

Using as a focal point Jung’s private notes from his 1939–1940 lectures on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, Dr. Thomas Patrick Lavin discusses the role of imaginal work in the quest for spiritual and psychological growth. The Spiritual Exercises is viewed as an initiation rite in which a Christian form of active imagination is presented. It was recorded in 1988.

The series is divided into the follow four topics:

  1. Seeing Jung and Ignatius in Their Historical Contexts
  2. Active Imagination and the Ignatian Methods of Prayer
  3. The Anima Christi and the Fundamentum
  4. Ignatius the Psychologist and Jung the Theologian

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1988 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

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For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with John Beebe, MD

This episode is the first hour of the seminar A New Model of Psychological Types.

Jung’s theory of psychological types is an attempt to make comprehensible the regular differences between individuals. His concepts of introversion and extraversion, thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition have gained wide currency since their introduction in 1920. However, applying these concepts to practical situations is often confusing. Dr. Beebe’s new model of typology shows how the eight types relate to complexes that can be recognized in dreams and styles of behavior. The model, which permits the types to be recognized more easily and with more precision, is illustrated with examples drawn from clinical work and works of creative imagination. It was recorded in 1988.

The following diagram outlines Beebe’s framework (click image to enlarge):

John Beebe, MD, a physician specializing in psychotherapy, is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. He is the author of Integrity in Depth, editor of C. G. Jung’s Aspects of the Masculine, and co-author of The Presence of the Feminine in Film. He is the founding editor of The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal (now titled Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche), and a was the first American co-editor of the London-based Journal of Analytical Psychology. An international lecturer, Beebe is widely known for his work on psychological types, the psychology of moral process, and the Jungian understanding of film. Recently he has been engaged in training the first generation of analytical psychologists in China.

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For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by John Beebe, click here.


© 1988 John Beebe. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

with June Singer, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Jungians Speak About Jungian Women.

Women’s contributions have been central to the development of Jung’s analytical psychology from its inception to the present. Their contributions include direct collaborations with Jung, amplification and interpretation of his ideas and original theoretical contributions to the field.

This special program includes lectures and discussion to explore the life, work, and influence of six Jungian women who have contributed significantly to the history of analytical psychology. The speakers are practicing analysts who talk about the ways in which these women have personally affected their own psychological and spiritual development and their work with clients. Through personal reflections and reminiscence of the speakers, listeners will come to know and appreciate the contributions of a wide range of Jungian women to the theory and practice of analytical psychology. It was recorded in 2001.

Topics and speakers included in Jungians Speak About Jungian Women are:

  1. The First Generation by June Singer
  2. Esther Harding by Mary Dougherty
  3. Helen Luke by Carol Donnelly
  4. Emma Jung by Carole Sorg
  5. Toni Wolf by Sue G. Rosenthal
  6. Marie-Louise Von Franz by Judy Shaw
  7. June Singer by Murray Stein

Singer-June1June Singer, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world. She is the author of many books, including Modern Woman in Search of Soul: A Jungian Guide to the Visible and Invisible WorldsAndrogyny: The Opposites WithinThe Unholy Bible: Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious, and Boundaries of the Soul: The Practice of Jung’s Psychology.

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For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Singer, click here.
For books by Dr. Singer, click here.


© 2001 June Singer. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

582imagewith Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myths to Grow By. In his later years, Joseph Campbell defined mythology as a system of energy-evoking and energy-directing symbols which serve four functions for individuals and for the culture: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and developmental functions. This course addresses the personal development aspects of mythological systems, using the writings of Joseph Campbell and others as a guide. Seen in their developmental function, myths are blueprints or road maps to personal growth. To know our own personal myth is to be filled with energy and progressive visions of an attainable goal. To know the myths of a culture is to know the path out the Wasteland. Myths are Daedalus-wings, allowing us to fly out of the labyrinthine pain of our own narrowness. This course explores mythological images and patterns as maps to personal and cultural development. It was recorded in 1995.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

Play

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1995 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

with Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW

This episode is part one of the series Terror, Evil, and Loss of the Self. In this seminar, Brenda Donahue discusses how survivors of childhood deprivation or physical and sexual abuse routinely describe themselves as freaks, existing outside of normal human relations because they feel evil or bad. This is because the child victim takes the evil of the abuser into him/herself in order to preserve the primary attachment to the parents. This sense of badness or evil becomes a staple of the personality structure, and many survivors spend their lives refusing to be absolved of blame. This course presents basic concepts from analytical psychology and shows how they can be useful in the treatment of post-traumatic stress syndrome. It was recorded in 1994.

Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW is a Jungian analyst in private practice in the western suburbs of Chicago and author of C. G. Jung’s Complex Dynamics and the Clinical Relationship: One Map for Mystery.

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For the complete series, click here.

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© 1994 Brenda Donahue. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman

with Karin Lofthus Carrington, MA, MFT.

Caroline Stevens, Jungian analyst and wise woman of our Jungian community, introduces Karin Carrington, psychotherapist, author, and teacher who shares her reflections and understandings about “same sex love” and “women loving women.”

This presentation on same sex love was a groundbreaking event in February 23, 1991.  Karen thanked the Jung Institute for its sponsorship of this historical event during these years of struggle to achieve legal and cultural rights for gay and lesbian people. I think it is safe to say that Karin’s presentation raised the consciousness of many in the audience concerning same sex love.

Karin situates her comments within the political struggle for lesbian and gay rights at that time.  In her presentation, she calls for a restorative analytic theory based in a deep understanding of what it means to love a member of one’s own gender for our selves and for the collective.

Karen quotes an early comment by Jung that homosexuality should not be the concern of legal authority – that persons loving people of their own sex should not be outside of the law.  She also examines the impact of Jung’s theory of contra-sexuality as well as the work of Robert Hopcke on the subject of same sex love and of Christine Downing on women loving women.

Finally, Karin opens the discussion to include questions about what is our true erotic nature as well as questions that explore the over-valuation of separation and the symbolic quest of the hero within current cultural values.

Karin Lofthus Carrington is a psychotherapist, consultant, writer, and teacher whose work focuses on the interrelationship of psychology, spirituality, and social conscience. She has authored and edited books on this topic including Same-Sex Love and The Path to Wholeness.

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Related talks include:
Views of the Animus
The Eroticization of Logos in Modern Times
Civilization in Transition: Jung’s Challenge to Culture in Crisis
Gold in Dark Places: Shadow Work in the Struggle for Self-hood
The Adventure of Being Human & Living, Loving in the Human Realm

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©  Karin Lofthus Carrington. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

Rediscovering the Wisdom of the Earth with China Galland.

One of the most important features of a pilgrimage is its intimate association with nature through the kaleidoscope of changing weather and landscape that one experiences along the way. Fellow pilgrims, strangers at the start, may feel like old friends by the end of a long journey made sleeping under the stars, walking through rain and sun together. All difficulty and differences are endured in service of one uniting spiritual goal: reaching the shrine and receiving the blessings of the deity therein.

Many contemporary pilgrimages to the Black Madonnas in Europe and Latin America echo the earlier, pre-Christian veneration of the earth as the Great Mother. In India and Nepal, Nature herself is still worshipped. One of the greatest tasks before us today is to understand “what it means ‘earthwise’ to be human in the world today,” as Michael McElroy, atmospheric scientist, told the United Nations.

This presentation explores how the experience of pilgrimage and the growing awareness of the Dark Mother can help us to understand more deeply “what it means ‘earthwise’ to be human in the world today.”

galland_chinaChina Galland is the award-winning author of Women in the Wilderness and Love Cemetery: Unburying the Secret History of Slaves, internationally recognized authority on the Black Madonna, leader of pilgrimages to sacred sites, wilderness guide, public speaker, and professor-in-residence at CARE/Graduate Theological Union. More information can be found at her website chinagalland.com.

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Related talks include:
Myths to Grow By
Women’s Spirit: The Fire Within
View from the Self: Archetype of Personal Identity
Orpheus & Eurydice: Journeys Through the Underworld

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©  China Galland. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

714imagewith Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D.

To be a crone is not a matter of age or appearance. Becoming  a “crone” is a crowning inner achievement. “Crones Don’t Whine” is the first of thirteen defining qualities of the crone because whining blocks spiritual and psychological development. Crone qualities are those that can be taken to heart and cultivated throughout life; they support authenticity, integrity, soul growth and social activism. While physiology and socialization make it more difficult for most men to develop crone qualities, exceptional men can become crones. Crone development comes through connecting deeply with others and with soul qualities in ourselves. Maturity, wisdom, and compassion develop over time through love and reflection; they are the fruits of consciousness and choice.

bolen-jean-shinodaJean Shinoda Bolen, M.D. is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women and of the International Transpersonal Association. She was a recipient of the Institute for Health and Healing’s “Pioneers in Art, Science, and the Soul of Healing Award” and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She is the author of The Tao of Psychology, Goddesses in Everywoman, Gods in Everyman, Ring of Power, Crossing to Avalon, Close to the Bone, The Millionth Circle, Goddesses in Older Women, Crones Don’t Whine, Urgent Message from Mother, and Like a Tree with over eighty foreign translations.

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For more by Jean Shinoda Bolen, CLICK HERE.

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©  Jean Shinoda Bolen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law