Tag: Transformation

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the series Christian Shamanism: Visions of Nikolas of Flue.

A shaman is a person who has been forced by fate to take an inner, awe-filled journey which ultimately gives a new form to the person and to the culture. This journey demands sacrifice, isolation from the collective’s expectations, and a particular form of courage which is able to accept new forms of awareness and new forms of the divine.

Every religious tradition has stories of persons who have walked the “shamanic path.” Some religious traditions have called shamans by different names: sage, saint, and Bodhisattva are but a few of these names. There is also the little-discussed Christian shamanic tradition in which C.G. Jung stands, both as a visionary and as a healer of souls. This course uses the writings of C.G. Jung and Marie-Louise von Franz as a basis for discussing the role of the shaman in general and the Christian shaman in particular. It was recorded in 1994.

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1994 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with David Rosen, MD

This episode is part one of the series Transforming Depression Through Symbolic Death and New Life: A Jungian Approach to Using the Creative Arts.

While working extensively with patients suffering from depression, Jungian analyst and psychiatrist David Rosen uncovered helpful clues to understanding this widespread malady. When people feel grief and despair or suffer from suicidal thoughts, they may feel like they are dying inside. In order to regain the will to live, Rosen believes, only a part of them – a false self – needs to die. When the false self is permitted to die symbolically (egocide) through drawing, pottery, writing, or other forms of creative expression, a kind of mourning process is set in motion. When the cycle comes to an end, the person is transformed and experiences new life, a rebirth of purpose and meaning. This workshop focuses on understanding depression and the quest for meaning, discerning the creative potential of suicide, and recognizing and treating depression and suicidal people. Crisis points such as adolescence, mid-life, divorce, and loss of a loved one are discussed. Drawing from actual case material, Dr. Rosen presents the egocide and transformation model, explains how it is applied and how it works, and explores its creative potential. It was recorded in 1994.

rosen_davidDavid Rosen, MD is a Jungian analyst and psychiatrist in College Station, Texas. He is a McMillan Professor of analytical psychology, professor of psychiatry and behavioral science, and professor of humanities in medicine at Texas A&M University. He is the author of four books, including Transforming Depression: A Jungian Approach to Using the Creative Arts.

For the complete series, click here.

For books by Dr. Rosen, click here.


© 1994 David Rosen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

with Lionel Corbett, MD

This episode is part one of the series The Religious Functions of the Psyche. In this seminar, Lionel Corbett reviews developments in self psychology from the point of view of the relationship between the Transpersonal Self and the personal self, a relationship with important implications for our understanding of spiritual growth. Includes discussions of suffering and the experience of the divine. Corbett explores Jung’s view of the innate capacity of the human psyche to have religious experience and to produce religious imagery. It was recorded in 1986.

corbettlionelLionel Corbett, MD received his Medical Degree from the University of Manchester, England, in 1966; served as a military physician; and became a Member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in 1974. In the USA, he did fundamental research into the biochemistry of the brain; began one of the first programs in the psychology of aging; was a hospital medical director of in-patient psychiatry; trained as a Jungian analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago 1978-1986; helped found a training program for Jungian analysts in Santa Fe, while carrying on a private practice and teaching psychiatry at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Corbett has studied various spiritual disciplines including Christian and Jewish mysticism, Buddhism, Advaita Vedanta, and Yoga and has had a personal meditation practice for 20 years. He now teaches depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute near Santa Barbara, California, where he founded the Psyche and the Sacred program, a highly successful series that integrates spirituality with depth psychology. This program has developed a powerful approach to spirituality that is based on personal experience of the sacred, avoiding all forms of doctrine and dogma. He is the author of 5 books, several training films, and about 40 professional articles. Publications Include: Fire in the Stone: The Alchemy of Desire (essay); Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond Religion; The Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a Spiritual Practice; The Religious Function of the Psyche.

For the complete series, click here.

To browse all of Dr. Corbett’s lectures, click here.

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© 1986 Lionel Corbett. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman

714imagewith Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D.

To be a crone is not a matter of age or appearance. Becoming  a “crone” is a crowning inner achievement. “Crones Don’t Whine” is the first of thirteen defining qualities of the crone because whining blocks spiritual and psychological development. Crone qualities are those that can be taken to heart and cultivated throughout life; they support authenticity, integrity, soul growth and social activism. While physiology and socialization make it more difficult for most men to develop crone qualities, exceptional men can become crones. Crone development comes through connecting deeply with others and with soul qualities in ourselves. Maturity, wisdom, and compassion develop over time through love and reflection; they are the fruits of consciousness and choice.

bolen-jean-shinodaJean Shinoda Bolen, M.D. is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women and of the International Transpersonal Association. She was a recipient of the Institute for Health and Healing’s “Pioneers in Art, Science, and the Soul of Healing Award” and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She is the author of The Tao of Psychology, Goddesses in Everywoman, Gods in Everyman, Ring of Power, Crossing to Avalon, Close to the Bone, The Millionth Circle, Goddesses in Older Women, Crones Don’t Whine, Urgent Message from Mother, and Like a Tree with over eighty foreign translations.

For more by Jean Shinoda Bolen, CLICK HERE.

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©  Jean Shinoda Bolen. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

Beastwith Anita Greene, Ph.D.

Anita Greene, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Amherst Massachusetts, and a teacher at the C.G. Jung Institute in Boston. She is also a Rubenfeld Synergist who combines gentle body techniques within her analytic work. She lectures widely on the integration of body and psyche.

There is no commentary for this lecture.

There is a short gap in the audio while the cassette was changed.

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© Anita Greene. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman