Society & Culture

Dennis Merritt | Presentation: Inflection Point in the Anthropocene Era and the Paradigm Shift of Jung’s New Age

The following video is an online presentation by Dennis Merritt, based on his article “Covid-19: Inflection Point in the Anthropocene Era and the Paradigm Shift of Jung’s New Age”., with the First Unitarian Society of Milwaukee, May 10th, 2020.

Dennis L. Merritt, Ph.D., is a Jungian psychoanalyst and ecopsychologist in private practice in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dr. Merritt is a diplomate of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich and also holds the following degrees: M.A. Humanistic Psychology-Clinical, Sonoma State University, California, Ph.D. Insect Pathology, University of California-Berkeley, M.S. and B.S. Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Over twenty-five years of participation in Lakota Sioux ceremonies have strongly influenced his worldview.

Dr. Merritt is the author of Jung, Hermes, and Ecopsychology: The Dairy Farmer’s Guide to the Universe Volumes 1 – 4.

Links: Dennis Merritt’s Website | Dennis Merritt’s Page on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago Website | EcoJung YouTube Channel

Racism & the Cultural Complex: Welcome to the United States of America (Full Seminar)

It seems appropriate at this point in time to share a seminar from our store, “Racism and the Cultural Complex: Welcome to the United States of America”, with Anita Mandley, MS, LCPC and Stephanie Fariss, JD, LCSW, in its entirety. It was recorded in the fall of 2015. From the seminar description:

A recent article in The Huffington Post reads: “A white man guns down nine black people in a church in South Carolina. The state’s Confederate battle flag stays waving in the wind the next day. The white man is arrested. He is given a Kevlar jacket. Welcome to the United States of American in 2015.” 

It is impossible to imagine how 350 years of slavery, segregation and racism would not have monumental consequences for both White and Black Americans.  And yet, many want to believe that electing an African American President has changed all that. Events during the last year have turned that fantastical belief on its head and now more than ever we must work to understand the insidious nature of racism. Depth psychology has an important role to play in this endeavor, especially as we begin to understand how shared historical and cultural trauma experiences lead to cultural complexes in groups and within the psyche of individuals. This course will explore the presence and power of historical and cultural traumas—how the legacy of these traumas impact the brains, bodies and minds of individuals, and how the shared experience of trauma creates cultural complexes that structure emotional experience.

Learning Objectives
By participating in this workshop, attendees will be able to:
1) Describe the relationship between historical and cultural traumas and cultural complexes;   
2) Explain Post-Traumatic Slavery Syndrome;   
3) Define micro-aggression and describe its component parts.

Recommended Reading & Viewing   
• O’Connor, F. (1971). “Everything that rises must converge.” In The Complete Stories, pp. 405-420.
• Borglum, L., Jensen, P.A. (Producers), & von Trier, L. (Director). (2005). Manderlay
• Coates, T. (2015). Between the World and Me.    
• DeGruy Leary, J.  (2005) Post Traumatic Slavery Syndrome:  America’s legacy of enduring injury and healing.     
• Obama, B. (2004). Dreams from My Father: A story of race and inheritance.    
• Singer, T. and Kimbles, S. (2004). The Cultural Complex: Contemporary Jungian perspectives on psyche and society

PowerPoint: A PDF of the slides shown in this seminar are available HERE

Video: A video shown in the seminar is available on YouTube HERE.

Anita Mandley, MS, LCPC is an Integrative Psychotherapist with over 30 years of experience in the field of Mental Health. Anita’s specific areas of special interest and expertise is in working with adults who struggle to manage their moods and those who have had significant experiences of invalidation, including experiences of trauma, violence, abuse, and neglect. The complexity of such experiences necessitates complexity in treatment. Anita’s integrative perspective and treatment approach is based on her belief that you need to treat clients’ distress in the context of their whole self: i.e. body, brain, mind, and spirit. Anita uses the dynamic Collaborative Stage Model, developed by Mary Jo Barrett to organize treatment in a way that increases efficacy, while avoiding the treatment pitfalls of the extremes of chaos and rigidity. Anita leads the Center’s Adult Integrative Trauma Team and Dialectical Behavior Therapy Team. She also does training and consultation for groups and individual clinicians at the Center. She also presents workshops at agencies and in the community on topics such as: Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Complex Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Post-traumatic Slavery Syndrome, Dissociative Identity Disorder, and Cultural Diversity, among others.

Stephanie Fariss, JD, LCSW is a member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts and a psychoanalyst in Chicago. She has a private practice in the Chicago loop where she sees individuals and couples and runs psychotherapy groups.  She has a special interest in the relevance of psychoanalytic thought to social issues such as addictions, race, organizational resilience, politics and animal welfare.

Support Us: Visit Our StoreMake a Donation

Thank you to our 2019 Supporter level donors: Bill Alexy, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Circle Center Yoga, Arlo and Rena Compaan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Lorna Crowl, D. Scott Dayton, George J. Didier, the Kuhl Family Foundation, Ramaa Krishnan & Full Bloomed Lotus, Suzanne G. Rosenthal, Deborah Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner.


© 2015 Anita Mandley and Stephanie Fariss. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Stefano Carpani | Past Plagues, Present Psyche: Finding Resilience, Creativity, and Joy in the Time of Coronavirus with Susan Rowland

This video is part of the series “Psychosocial Wednesdays”, an initiative by: Paul Attinello, Stefano Carpani and Bernhard von Guretzky.

Susan Rowland, PhD is associate Chair of two hybrid programs at Pacifica Graduate Institute: MA Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life MA. Author of seven books on Jung, literary theory, gender and ecology, her latest work is The Ecocritical Psyche (Routledge 2012), which argues for a symbol embodying a reciprocal relationship with non-human nature. Previously Professor of Jungian Studies at the University of Greenwich, London, she was founding Chair of the International Association of Jungian Studies 2003-6.

Stefano’s YouTube Channel | Stefano’s Website | Susan Rownland’s page and recorded lectures on the C. G, Jung Institute of Chicago Website | Susan Rowland’s Website | All COVID-19 related posts

CIIS | Richard Tarnas: What’s Happening in the Stars Right Now

In this video by the California Institute for Integral Studies, cultural historian Richard Tarnas shared his thoughts about the synchronicity of what is happening in the heavens with what is happening now on our planet with COVID-19.  He offered an astrological perspective as to what was happening that seems to be affecting our planet, among such things as climate change and this pandemic. Tarnas offers a wider view of the history of the conjunctions of Pluto-Jupiter and Saturn which also coincided with other records of historical events.

Links: Richard Tarnas’s Website | California Institute for Integral Studies | ArchetypalView YouTube Channel

They Had a Dream (We Have a Dream): C G Jung, MLK, and the Evocative Power of Symbols

with Jennifer Leigh Selig, PhD

In continuation of our COVID-19 response, we are sharing another full seminar. You can support our ongoing efforts to provide free and low-cost educational resources during this pandemic by making a donation on our website or a purchase in our audio and video store. We have extended our Stay Connected Sale through May 31st, so you can still get 40% everything in our store (use the coupon code CONNECT on the cart page before checkout).

Jung initially rejected the invitation to write Man and His Symbols, whose intention was to make Jungian psychology understandable to a general audience, but a dream convinced him otherwise. In his dream, he speaks to a multitude of enthralled people who understand everything he says. In this presentation on Chapter 1 of Man and His Symbols, “Approaching the Unconscious,” we’ll explore how two years after Jung completed both his chapter and his life, Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke to a multitude of enthralled people and translated many Jungian concepts into everyday language in his “I Have a Dream” speech. Jung’s chapter is concerned with four major areas—the unconscious, dreams, archetypes, and symbols—all four of which we find illustrated and translated to a general audience in King’s dream speech. We’ll dream the dream forward into the 2020 election and see how leading presidential candidates are working with archetypes and symbols as well, on behalf of the psychological health of the body politic.

A PDF of the PowerPoint shown during the seminar, which includes links to the videos on YouTube, is available HERE . It was recorded on October 4, 2019.

Jennifer Leigh Selig, PhD is the founder and former chair of the Jungian and Archetypal Studies doctoral degree at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She has spent almost two decades researching, writing about, and presenting on Martin Luther King, Jr., including her 2005 title, Integration: The Psychology and Mythology of Martin Luther King, Jr. and His (Unfinished) Therapy With the Soul of America. Her latest books include Everyday Reverence: A Hundred Ways to Kneel , Kiss the Ground, and a co-authored volume titled Deep Creativity: Seven Ways to Spark Your Creative Spiritjenniferleighselig.com

Support Us: Visit Our StoreMake a Donation

Thank you to our 2019 Supporter level donors: Bill Alexy, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Circle Center Yoga, Arlo and Rena Compaan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Lorna Crowl, D. Scott Dayton, George J. Didier, the Kuhl Family Foundation, Ramaa Krishnan & Full Bloomed Lotus, Suzanne G. Rosenthal, Deborah Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner.


© 2019 Jennifer Leigh Selig. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Death Panels: Our Cultural Complex Around Death

with Dan Ross, RN, PMHNP

In recognition of the current COVID-19 pandemic and the crisis affecting our healthcare system, we are sharing a recent seminar by Dan Ross, “Death Panels: Our Cultural Complex around Death”, in its entirety. This seminar was part of our public program series this year, and was recorded on February 28th, 2020.

The Spirit of the Times shapes our heroic attitude toward disease and death. Instead of the initiatory experience that fear of death can provide, we are paralyzed in our fear and cling to images of immortality found in modern medical institutions. The Affordable Care Act’s provision of reimbursing medical practitioners for having end-of-life discussions with patients with life-limiting illnesses constellated a collective panic. The cultural complex distorted these simple end-of-life discussions (brilliantly discussed in the best-selling book by Atul Gawande, Being Mortal) into what were called “Death Panels.” The fear was that a group of professionals would sit around and decide whether we should live or die. What was behind this cultural complex?

When we are forced to engage with the healthcare industry through illness, we are carried along a hero’s journey to treat death as the ultimate evil, and, in the process, we miss the transformative opportunities an encounter with death can provide. How did modern medicine come to carry for us the image of immortality? In this program, we will use myth, literature, and film to explore the Spirit of the Depths to better understand the archetypal underpinnings of modern medicine’s relationship to death and immortality.

PowerPoint slides used in the talk are available HERE

Dan Ross, RN, PMHNP, MSN, MBA has been a nurse for 40 years. He has worked extensively as Director of Clinical Services in the field of home health care and hospice. As a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, he brings both a medical and psychiatric experience to his work. He currently works part time in the field of Palliative Care and Hospice as a Nurse Practitioner, visiting patients in their home or nursing facility helping them in their transition to hospice. He is also a Jungian Analyst in private practice in downtown Chicago.

Support Us: Visit Our StoreMake a Donation

Thank you to our 2019 Supporter level donors: Bill Alexy, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Circle Center Yoga, Arlo and Rena Compaan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Lorna Crowl, D. Scott Dayton, George J. Didier, the Kuhl Family Foundation, Ramaa Krishnan & Full Bloomed Lotus, Suzanne G. Rosenthal, Deborah Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner.


© 2020 Dan Ross. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

The Four Couples Within: The Structure of the Self and the Dynamics of Relationship

with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Four Couples Within: The Structure of the Self and the Dynamics of Relationship. It was recorded in 1989.

The four archetypal couples inherent in the Self—the King and Queen, the Warriors, the Magicians, the Lovers—create four distinct psychosocial environments within a relationship. The archetypal dynamics underlying both fulfillment and frustration in human relationships are examined in this seminar recording, with particular focus on marital dynamics and sexual dysfunction.

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE

Support Us:     


© 1989 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Mythology and Psychology: A Jungian Perspective

with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Myth and Psyche: An Introduction to Jungian Perspectives on Human Mythology. It was recorded in 1992.

According to Jung, myth-making is a natural and impersonal potential present in the collective unconscious of all peoples throughout all times. Drawing on the contributions of Jung, Campbell, and Eliade, this course explores the role of myth in human life. Five of the major mythological themes prominent in world mythology are examined in terms of their contemporary psychological and cultural significance:

  1. Mythology of Creation
  2. Mythology of The Divine Child
  3. Mythology of The Hero
  4. Mythology of The Shaman
  5. Mythology of The Apocalypse

This episode is the introductory session for the series, titled “Mythology and Psychology: A Jungian Perspective”.

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE

Support Us:     


© 1992 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Bonus: The Fate of Depth Psychology in the New Millenium

with June Singer and other Analysts

As we enter a new year, it seems right to share the recording of the program “The Fate of Depth Psychology in the New Millenium”, held in 1998. It includes introductory remarks by June Singer and a lengthy discussion with panel and audience members. We hope this event will facilitate reflection as we enter 2018. From the original CD jacket:

“As we approach the year 2000 humanity finds itself, as it always will, wrestling with the eternal questions of the meaning of existence and their relationship to spirit and matter. Given the direction of contemporary brain research and science, the growing psychopharmacological approach to mental and emotional disorders, the emergence of managed care, and the economics of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, we have to wonder what challenges depth psychology will face in the years ahead.

This program takes up this critical question as seven Jungian analysts share their individual visions of the fate that awaits depth psychology in the new millennium. The panel members each present a brief synopsis of his/her vision and then engage with the audience in a lively discussion of their ideas, reactions, and intuitions.”

Singer-June1June Singer, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world. She is the author of many books, including Modern Woman in Search of Soul: A Jungian Guide to the Visible and Invisible WorldsAndrogyny: The Opposites WithinThe Unholy Bible: Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious, and Boundaries of the Soul: The Practice of Jung’s Psychology.


For more seminars by June Singer, click here
For books by June Singer, click here


© 1998. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law

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About Jungianthology

Jungianthology Radio is home to a variety of podcasts that range from archival seminar recordings (Institute Archives), to interviews (Jung in the World) to discussion on film (Healing Cinema), fairy tales (Jungian Ever After), and our programs.

The Jungianthology Blog shares essays, articles, video, audio, and other resources by members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts and other groups that support the education and development of our community.

The views and opinions expressed in the podcasts and blog posts are those of the respected speakers or authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago.

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