Jungianthology Podcast Posts

with Warren Sibilla, Jr, PhDEp13-Sibilla.

Using examples from Zen Buddhism, Warren Sibilla discusses Jung’s idea that the subjective and objective have a complementary relationship, and that this relationship is necessary in clinical practice – objective knowledge alone is not enough.

sibilla_warrenWarren Sibilla, Jr, PhD is a Diplomate Jungian Psychoanalyst with a clinical practice in Chicago, IL and South Bend, IN.  Dr. Sibilla served as the Director of the Jungian Psychotherapy/Studies Program (2010 – 2016) at the Institute and teaches in our Analyst Training Program.  He is engaged in the study and practice of Zen Buddhism including authoring a book on the relationship between Zen Buddhism and Analytical Psychology as well as a paper formally exploring Jung’s 1958 dialogue with Japanese Zen Master and Philosopher Hisamatsu. Dr. Sibilla teaches in the Masters and Doctoral programs at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology and The Institute for Clinical Social Work and facilitates silent contemplative retreats at GilChrist Retreat Center in Michigan. More information about Dr. Sibilla is available on his website, wsibilla.com.

PowerPoint: The slides for this talk are available HERE (right-click and click “Save Link As…” to download)

For all of Dr Sibilla’s lectures, CLICK HERE

Related talks include:
The Religious Functions of the Psyche
Psychotherapy and Spirituality
Spirituality and Psychological Type
The Archetypal Underpinnings of Religious Practice

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©  Warren Sibilla. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

with John Beebe, MD.

In this lecture, Dr. Beebe explores a neglected area in analytical psychology, the influence of the father’s unconscious upon the later development of the son. Jung’s analytical psychology offers insight into the way a father’s feminine side influences the formation of the anima of the son. It was recorded on February 2nd, 1984 and includes the original introduction by Murray Stein.

beebejohnJohn Beebe, MD a physician specializing in psychotherapy, is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. He is the author of Integrity in Depth, editor of C. G. Jung’s Aspects of the Masculine, and co-author of The Presence of the Feminine in Film. He is the founding editor of The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal (now titled Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche), and a was the first American co-editor of the London-based Journal of Analytical Psychology. An international lecturer is widely known for his work on psychological types, the psychology of moral process, and the Jungian understanding of film. Recently he has been engaged in training the first generation of analytical psychologists in China.

Audio issue: The microphone in the original event was too sensitive, which caused loud distortions when the speaker got too close to it. We have done what we can to make those less obtrusive, but you will still hear them.

Other talks by John Beebe:
A New Model of Psychological Types
The Conscience of the Post-Modern Artist

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©  John Beebe. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

with Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW.

The work of C.G. Jung offers thoughtful clinicians useful, practical insights into the emotional lives of clients.  Yet much of his work remains unknown to many clinicians.  The “Getting to Know Jung” series, which began with this lecture on September 18, 2015, introduces Jung’s key concepts. In this lecture, Boris Matthews will present Jung’s concept of individuation, explaining why it was so important to Jung and how it applies in today’s clinical setting.

matthews_borisBoris Matthews, PhD graduated from the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, and maintains a practice of analytical psychology in the Milwaukee and Madison, WI, areas. He is particularly interested in working with persons who recognize need to develop a balanced adaptation to the “outside” and to the “inside” worlds, work that involves awareness of the individual’s psychological typology. Dreams, active imagination, and spiritual concerns are integral elements in the analytic work, the ultimate goal of which is to develop a functioning dialog with the non-ego center, the Self. He serves on the faculty and various committees of the Institute, regularly teaches classes for analytic candidates, and conducts study groups in Madison as well as by video conference.

PowerPoint: The slides for this talk are available HERE (right-click and click “Save Link As…” to download)

Related talks include:
The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation
Individuation in Later Life and the Return of the Inner Child
Analysis and Individuation

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©  Boris Matthews. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

with Karin Lofthus Carrington, MA, MFT.

Caroline Stevens, Jungian analyst and wise woman of our Jungian community, introduces Karin Carrington, psychotherapist, author, and teacher who shares her reflections and understandings about “same sex love” and “women loving women.”

This presentation on same sex love was a groundbreaking event in February 23, 1991.  Karen thanked the Jung Institute for its sponsorship of this historical event during these years of struggle to achieve legal and cultural rights for gay and lesbian people. I think it is safe to say that Karin’s presentation raised the consciousness of many in the audience concerning same sex love.

Karin situates her comments within the political struggle for lesbian and gay rights at that time.  In her presentation, she calls for a restorative analytic theory based in a deep understanding of what it means to love a member of one’s own gender for our selves and for the collective.

Karen quotes an early comment by Jung that homosexuality should not be the concern of legal authority – that persons loving people of their own sex should not be outside of the law.  She also examines the impact of Jung’s theory of contra-sexuality as well as the work of Robert Hopcke on the subject of same sex love and of Christine Downing on women loving women.

Finally, Karin opens the discussion to include questions about what is our true erotic nature as well as questions that explore the over-valuation of separation and the symbolic quest of the hero within current cultural values.

Karin Lofthus Carrington is a psychotherapist, consultant, writer, and teacher whose work focuses on the interrelationship of psychology, spirituality, and social conscience. She has authored and edited books on this topic including Same-Sex Love and The Path to Wholeness.

Related talks include:
Views of the Animus
The Eroticization of Logos in Modern Times
Civilization in Transition: Jung’s Challenge to Culture in Crisis
Gold in Dark Places: Shadow Work in the Struggle for Self-hood
The Adventure of Being Human & Living, Loving in the Human Realm

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©  Karin Lofthus Carrington. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law

Rediscovering the Wisdom of the Earth with China Galland.

One of the most important features of a pilgrimage is its intimate association with nature through the kaleidoscope of changing weather and landscape that one experiences along the way. Fellow pilgrims, strangers at the start, may feel like old friends by the end of a long journey made sleeping under the stars, walking through rain and sun together. All difficulty and differences are endured in service of one uniting spiritual goal: reaching the shrine and receiving the blessings of the deity therein.

Many contemporary pilgrimages to the Black Madonnas in Europe and Latin America echo the earlier, pre-Christian veneration of the earth as the Great Mother. In India and Nepal, Nature herself is still worshipped. One of the greatest tasks before us today is to understand “what it means ‘earthwise’ to be human in the world today,” as Michael McElroy, atmospheric scientist, told the United Nations.

This presentation explores how the experience of pilgrimage and the growing awareness of the Dark Mother can help us to understand more deeply “what it means ‘earthwise’ to be human in the world today.”

galland_chinaChina Galland is the award-winning author of Women in the Wilderness and Love Cemetery: Unburying the Secret History of Slaves, internationally recognized authority on the Black Madonna, leader of pilgrimages to sacred sites, wilderness guide, public speaker, and professor-in-residence at CARE/Graduate Theological Union. More information can be found at her website chinagalland.com.

Related talks include:
Myths to Grow By
Women’s Spirit: The Fire Within
View from the Self: Archetype of Personal Identity
Orpheus & Eurydice: Journeys Through the Underworld

Creative Commons License
©  China Galland. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Edited by Ben Law