Category: Life Cycle

Thomas Moore will be visiting us in October to lead a two-day seminar (registration is open now). As an introduction to Moore’s perspective and voice, we are sharing the first hour of his previous workshop with us, Cultivating Soul, which included two parts:

Part 1: Ageless Soul
Thomas Moore will speak about the themes of his book, Ageless Soul, and engage in conversation with attendees and analysts. Ageless soul offers positive and inspiring guidance for becoming a full person as time goes by. Since we are all aging, it is for anyone who has ever thought about getting older. It’s especially valuable for people 50 and over. It seems more difficult than ever these days to deal creatively with aging. This book provides a deep and comprehensive plan that sees aging not as losing capacity but as becoming who you are destined to be, a real human being. It covers key matters, such as:

 – the shock of discovering that you’re getting older
  – how to keep your youth in a deep way
  – how to manage your sexuality as you age
  – how spirituality can mature and become more important over time
  – how to value your life by leaving a conscious legacy for your family and your society
  – responding well to loneliness and depression
  – nurturing friendships and community as you get older

Part 2: Care of the Soul in Troubled Times
For all of our problems, our times are in many ways better than the past. Throughout history, much has been achieved creatively in very troubled times. This is a time to resist the culture (contemptus mundi) and live your own life of excellence and beauty. It’s a time to assume leadership for change and returning to eternal values. Study the best of lives in our past and be inspired toward creativity and excellence (aréte).

This seminar was recorded on October 28, 2017.

Thomas Moore, PhD is the author of nearly two dozen books on deepening spirituality and cultivating soul in every aspect of life. His book, Care of the Soul, was a #1 New York Times bestseller. Well-known within the Jungian community, he has been a monk, a musician, a university professor, and a psychotherapist. He lectures frequently in Ireland and has a special love of Irish culture. He has a PhD in religion from Syracuse University and has won several awards for his work, including an honorary doctorate from Lesley University and the Humanitarian Award from Einstein Medical School of Yeshiva University. Three of his books have won the prestigious Books for a Better Life awards. He writes fiction and music and often works with his wife, artist and yoga instructor, Hari Kirin. Much of his recent work has focused on the world of medicine, speaking to nurses and doctors about the soul and spirit of medical practice. thomasmooresoul.com

For the full seminar, CLICK HERE.
To register for Moore’s upcoming workshop, CLICK HERE.

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© 2017 Thomas Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Anthony Stevens, MD

This episode is part one of the series The Archetypal Realities of Everyday Life. It was recorded in 1986.

This seminar examines the ways in which the archetypes of the collective unconscious guide, form, and vitalize our daily existence. We can perceive this archetypal influence subjectively in consciousness and objectively in art and literature.  As Jung wrote: “The impact of an archetype, whether it takes the form of an immediate experience or is expressed through the spoken word, stirs us because it summons up a voice that is stronger than our own”. In this seminar works of art from pre-historic times up to the present are examined to see how they both express for us and evoke in us the fundamental archetypes of the human experience.

NOTE: We do not have the images that were used in this seminar, though we know one of them is Hans Holbein’s painting The Ambassadors (below).

The Ambassadors

Anthony Stevens, MD holds degrees in medicine and psychology from Oxford University and a diploma in psychological medicine from the Royal College of Physicians. A frequent lecturer at the Jung Institutes of London and Zürich, he has also given presentations at the Los Angeles and San Francisco Institutes. Dr. Stevens is author of Jung: A Very Short IntroductionArchetypes: A Natural History of the Self, The Story of Withymead: A Jungian Community for the Healing Arts, and Ariadne’s Clue: A Guide to the Symbols of Humankind.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.

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© 1986 Anthony Stevens. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Murray Stein, PhD

This episode is part one of the series Understanding the Meaning of Alchemy. It was recorded in 1992.

During the last thirty years of his life, Jung turned to alchemy as a fundamental resource for depth psychology. In alchemy he found images and thoughts that were uniquely fitted to his perceptions of psychological life and that confirmed his views of the spontaneous activity and directedness of the unconscious. Jungian analyst and author Murray Stein presents an overview of Jung’s work on alchemy to develop an understanding of the relation of alchemical symbols to the analytical process and individuation. The set includes the following lectures:

  1. Commentary on The Secret of the Golden Flower [in CW 13]
  2. Psychology and Alchemy [CW 12, parts 1 & 2]
  3. The Spirit Mercurius [in CW 13]
  4. The Psychology of Transference [in CW 16]
  5. Mysterium Coniunctionis [CW 14, Chap. 6]

stein_murrayMurray Stein, PhD is a training analyst at the International School for Analytical Psychology in Zurich, Switzerland. His most recent publications include The Principle of Individuation, Jung’s Map of the Soul, and The Edinburgh International Encyclopaedia of Psychoanalysis (Editor of the Jungian sections, with Ross Skelton as General Editor). He lectures internationally on topics related to Analytical Psychology and its applications in the contemporary world. Dr. Stein is a graduate of Yale University (B.A. and M.Div.), the University of Chicago (Ph.D., in Religion and Psychological Studies), and the C.G. Jung Institut-Zurich. He is a founding member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. He has been the president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (2001-4), and is presently a member of the Swiss Society for Analytical Psychology and President of the International School of Analytical Psychology, Zurich.

For the complete series, click here.

To browse all of Dr. Stein’s lectures, click here.

Creative Commons License
© 1992 Murray Stein. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman

with Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series Jung’s Commentary on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola.

Using as a focal point Jung’s private notes from his 1939–1940 lectures on the Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola, Dr. Thomas Patrick Lavin discusses the role of imaginal work in the quest for spiritual and psychological growth. The Spiritual Exercises is viewed as an initiation rite in which a Christian form of active imagination is presented. It was recorded in 1988.

The series is divided into the follow four topics:

  1. Seeing Jung and Ignatius in Their Historical Contexts
  2. Active Imagination and the Ignatian Methods of Prayer
  3. The Anima Christi and the Fundamentum
  4. Ignatius the Psychologist and Jung the Theologian

Thomas Patrick Lavin, PhD is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst who holds a PhD in clinical psychology and a PhD in theology. He was formerly chief clinical psychologist for the U.S. Army in Europe and is a founding member of the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. He is in private practice in Wilmette, Illinois, and consults internationally on typology, spirituality and addictions.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Lavin, click here.


© 1988 Thomas Patrick Lavin. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law