Category: Blog Posts

Thank you to the Pacifica Graduate Institute for sharing this video in full. From the video description:

Psychotherapists who are interested in Depth Psychology are living in a professional world that is dominated by cognitive behavioral approaches—Lionel Corbett, M.D., explains why psychotherapy based on Depth Psychology is often the superior approach.

Lionel Corbett, MD is a professor of depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. His primary interests are: the religious function of the psyche, especially the way in which personal religious experience is relevant to individual psychology; the development of psychotherapy as a spiritual practice; and the interface of Jungian psychology and contemporary psychoanalytic thought. He is the author of numerous professional papers and four books: Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond ReligionThe Religious Function of the PsycheThe Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a spiritual practice, and most recently The Soul in Anguish: Psychotherapeutic approaches to suffering.


Links: Lionel Corbett on the Jungianthology Podcast & Blog | Lionel Corbett’s lectures on the C. G. Jung Institite of Chicago Website | The Pacifica Graduate Institute YouTube Channel | The Pacifica Graduate Institute

Blog Posts Corbett, Lionel

During this pandemia, the archetype of the hermit is knocking at the door worldwide. Then, quietly, he looks at us in the privacy of our homes, with ancient eyes, offering the gift of contemplation with which we awake to what is around us. We sense ourselves more. Also, the hermit’s abode is silence, which welcomes and embraces the fullness of life within; yet, at our homes, his visit may make us tremble with terror when facing such emptiness of sound and the magnitude of the space within. He carries a lamp to guide the inner traveler to the realm of solitude. Yes! During this pandemia, the hermit has brought, worldwide, the gifts of solitude, silence, and contemplation, which, for some people, may be unbearable to withstand, forcing them to run away from themselves. Thomas Merton wrote: “Not all men are called to be hermits, but all men need enough silence and solitude in their lives to enable the deep inner voice of their own true self to be heard at least occasionally.”

This post originally appeared in English and Spanish on thehealingpsyche.org.

Freddie Taborda, LCPC, PsyD is a Jungian Analyst with over 30 years of clinical experience. He maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois.


Links: Dr. Taborda’s Website | About Dr. Taborda | Dr. Taborda’s Page on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Website

Blog Posts Essays Taborda, Freddie

The following post is part of a series of reflections by Jungian Psychoanalyst Ashok Bedi, MD & Jungian Psychotherapist Robert BJ Jakala, PhD. Dr. BJ Jakala is a photographer and Dr. Bedi and Dr. Jakala jointly amplify the image. The ongoing series is available on pathtothesoul.com.

We seek the effective images, the thought-forms that satisfy the restlessness of heart and mind, and we find the treasures of the East.

Jung, 1934/1954/1968, p. 13

I was walking through a small village when I encountered this woman sitting on the wall. When I gestured to her to gain permission to take her photo. She nodded. As I raised my camera, she raised her hands to the namaste position. I pressed the shutter and lowered my camera but continued to look at her looking at me. I felt blessed. Her grounded soulfulness welcomed the moment of encounter with another. I felt her hospitality; without a camera she captured me. There was need for a polite smile by either of us. The gratitude of being recognized at a deeper level eliminated the idea of surface pleasantries.

Life in the United States has very few moments of stillness unless we make them. The pandemic, social justice, political upheaval, concerns about schooling in the fall leave little space for a full acknowledgement. Yet, we all need to be seen, heard, understood, and loved. I would benefit from creating and partaking in more moments with the woman sitting on a wall.

Most of us engage a lifestyle of horizontal engagement with the mundane, survival dimension of our daily, routine and busy existence. This calls for a balance with attention to a vertical axis of interiority, spirituality and the sacred dimension of our lives. When the horizontal, survival axis of our daily life intersects with the vertical, archetypal axis of our inner life, it forms a symbol of the Cross – a symbol of Wholeness. This calls for a sacrifice in the material/horizontal life to make room for the contemplative space to engage the sacred.

Bedi, Ashok Blog Posts COVID-19 Pandemic Current Events Essays

This new release of Dora Kalff’s classic Sandplay: A Psychotherapeutic Approach to the Psyche, is edited by Dyane Sherwood, PhD and translated by Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW, NCPsyA; both are members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. It is published by Analytical Psychology Press. From the publisher:

Dora Kalff’s classic, originally published in German in 1966, is the foundational book of the psychotherapeutic modality she called ”Sandspiel” in German, translated ”Sandplay” in English. In sandplay, the therapist quietly witnesses while the patient creates a ”world” in a shallow tray half-filled with sand. Miniatures and natural objects, such as stones and shells, are provided for use in these creations.

Sandplay is now practiced around the world. Contemporary readers will discover that Frau Kalff’s wisdom and way of working with children and young adults feels fresh and engaging. Her deep insight into the development of the human psyche, with reference to Eastern contemplative traditions and the work of C. G. Jung, has found support from contemporary neuroscience.

Sandplay is widely integrated into therapeutic work with both children and adults, allowing body-based emotions and memories to emerge in a ”safe and protected space.” It has found particular application to trauma, including relief work following natural disasters and in zones of conflict.

In 1985, Kalff and her students founded the International Society for Sandplay Therapy, with branches in many countries. It is a collegial society that provides training and certification in sandplay therapy and is affiliated with the International Association of Analytical Psychology.

A review by Rosalind Heiko, PhD reads:

Kalff’s book is wonderfully accessible, and the case histories of the children resonate with spirit and compassion through their sand stories in the trays. It was the first book I read on Sandplay – and it fascinated me over 25 years ago, as it does now. I highly recommend this edition!

Blog Posts Community News Matthews, Boris Sherwood, Dyane

Speaking of Jung, a podcast by Laura London, is a wonderful series of interviews with Jungian Analysts. In this episode, recorded on March 14, 2016, she interviews George Hogenson, PhD, LCSW, member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts.

Dr. Hogenson is a diplomate Jungian analyst in private practice in Chicago, where he works primarily with adults dealing with life transitions, dream work, and trauma.  He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, is the author of Jung’s Struggle with Freud as well as numerous articles on archetypal theory, synchronicity and the nature of symbols.  His teaching in the Analyst Training Program of the Institute has concentrated on the works of Jung, and he offers supervision and small reading groups for clinicians interested in Jung’s psychological system. Prior to becoming an analyst, Dr. Hogenson was on the faculty of the Yale School of Management, and a consultant to many organizations on leadership and strategy.  He continues to work with individual executives and organizations on management issues using the principles of Jungian psychology.

Listen to the interview on

Speaking of Jung is available through a variety of podcasting platforms and apps, including Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, TuneIn, Spotify, and iHeartRadio. Just search for “Speaking of Jung” in your favorite podcasts app to subscribe on your mobile device. You can also listen to select episodes on YouTube.


Links: The Speaking of Jung Podcast Website | This Episode of Speaking of Jung | The Speaking of Jung YouTube Channel | George Hogenson’s Recorded Lectures on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago Website

Blog Posts Hogenson, George Interviews London, Laura