Category: <span>Blog Posts</span>

Dennis Merritt, member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts, is interviewed on the Image for Hire podcast. It was released on October 30, 2018. From the description:

The Skrauss discusses synchronicity and the I-Ching with Dennis A. Merrit.
Listen up, Cavedweller. Take a plunge into the divinatory system that cracks into the Tao, the binary code of the Universe.

Names dropped and subjects mentioned:
Synchronicity is a Dimension
How Much Is the I-Ching (Unanswered)
Compendium of Chinese Wisdom
It Came From 1050 BCE
Leibnitz
How to Question the I-Ching
Carol Anthony’s 3RD Edition Guide to the I-Ching
Time is Not Just Quantity; It Is Quality
Gausian Curve
The Rainmaker Story
“Black Elk Speaks”
Wolfgang Pauli
Hexagram 42 “Increase”
The Confucian School
Hexagram 23 “Splitting Apart”
Hexagram 24 “The Turning Point”
Yellow is the Color of the Medium
Donald Trump is a Trickster
Cover Story of the January 1976 edition of Scientific America

Dennis L. Merritt, PhD, is a Jungian psychoanalyst and ecopsychologist in private practice in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Dr. Merritt is a diplomate of the C.G. Jung Institute, Zurich and also holds the following degrees: M.A. Humanistic Psychology-Clinical, Sonoma State University, California, Ph.D. Insect Pathology, University of California-Berkeley, M.S. and B.S. Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Over twenty-five years of participation in Lakota Sioux ceremonies have strongly influenced his worldview.

Dr. Merritt is the author of Jung, Hermes, and Ecopsychology: The Dairy Farmer’s Guide to the Universe Volumes 1 – 4.

Links: Dennis Merritt’s Blog | Dennis Merritt’s Practice Website | Dennis Merritt’s Page on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago Website | Image for Hire podcast on SoundCloud

Blog Posts Eastern Philosophy Individuation Interviews Merritt, Dennis Nature Religion & Spirituality Ritual & Initiation Self and Self-Psychology Synchronicity

Thank you to Dr. Dana C. White and Dr. Will Linn for sharing the recording of this online salon with Jungian Analyst Jean Shinoda Bolen. It was recorded in August, 2020.

Links: Dr. Dana White’s YouTube Channel

Blog Posts Bolen, Jean Shinoda COVID-19 Pandemic Current Events Interviews Linn, Will Myth/Fairytale Society & Culture White, Dana

The C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago is currently closed to all in-person gatherings to ensure the health and safety of our membership and program participants during the Covid-19 pandemic.  All educational programming, meetings, and operations will remain on-line until such time that it is safe to gather in-person once more and there is full use of our Monadnock space.  We continue to monitor the situation closely for the time when we can resume in-person gatherings at the Institute and anticipate that this may happen in January 2022.  The decision to return to in-person gatherings will be based on CDC guidelines and State and City mandates.  Appropriate health and safety protocols for vaccinations, mask-wearing, hand sanitizing, and surface-room cleaning will be instituted with the resumption of in-person gatherings.

Please refer back to our website for updates.

Stephanie Buck, President

Blog Posts Community News Statements

This online course was recorded on June 30, 2015. From the video description:

This course is made possible by Ashok Bedi, MD, by the generous grant from the USA India Jung Foundation: a not for profit 501c(3) charitable Wisconsin Foundation(support the foundation here: uijf.org/donate.php) and the CG Jung Institute of Chicago. Thank you to the presenters for giving permission to publish the material. This video is for public and professional education purposes only, not for reuse for profit purposes.

Dr. Lance Longo is medical director of addiction psychiatry at Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

Links: Ashok Bedi’s YouTube channel

Bedi, Ashok Blog Posts Longo, Lance Seminars

“We continue to speak, if only in whispers, to something inside us that
wants to be named.”

Dorianne Laux, “Dark Chants,” Only as the Day is Long.

My name is Chaika Runya bat Yitzchak v’ Channa Gittl. This is my ‘Hebrew’ name, my sacred name, my Yiddish name, my hidden name, my underground name, the name that binds me to family lineage and tradition and to my people, going all the way back to the beginning of time. This is the name I am called in Jewish ritual, when I have an aliyah to give a blessing over the Torah or when I am invited to the pulpit to read the Torah, or when I am a witness to someone immersing herself in the sacred baths in order to convert to Judaism.

I am named for two great aunts who were murdered in the Holocaust.

Most mornings of my life, since I was younger than six years old, I’ve woken in terror, heart beating fast, body sweating. In an effort to calm myself I’d listen to music or focus on my breathing before opening my eyes to start the day. Each morning the fear would dissolve as I moved into the day’s activities, only to return the next.

One morning, not long ago I decided to turn toward the fear and terror rather than away, to be curious about it, to explore it, to get to know it. I curled up in the fetal position in bed, tuning in to the sensations I experienced physically. I became aware of a feeling like electric jolts pounding and jumping in my chest and arms. I asked the sensations, “What is the message held in my body?”

What I heard them say was this: “Life is not safe.”

My mother tells me my aunts, Chaika and Runya, the younger sisters of my mother’s father, were shot, killed and buried in a mass grave in then Austria-Hungary during the Holocaust. In my mind’s eye, here is how I imagine them: They are two young women, maybe in their 20s; their light brown hair hangs in braids down their backs, each wears a dark wool dress, a cream-colored pinafore, woolen knee-high socks and sturdy shoes. They stand with their family and friends and fellow-townspeople, all of whom have been herded out of their homes, their beds, and lined up at the town’s edge, in rows, ahead of them the deep pit into which their lifeless bodies will be tossed, one on top of another, like sacks of potatoes, to be covered with dirt, and erased.

I imagine dogs barking wildly and the loud yelling of male voices in a language my aunts and their friends and family don’t understand. They do understand what will happen to them. I imagine the rifle shots as faceless men mechanically shoot them from behind, one by one, and I imagine the unbearable, unimaginable terror of waiting as your turn comes, hearing the screams, hearing the heavy plop as each body falls into the pit, witnessing your loved ones’ deaths, knowing your inescapable fate, waiting to feel pain, feeling the bullet entering your chest from the back, breathing your last breath, collapsing and tumbling, finally, into the pit. In their names, their stories, their lives, their deaths take residence within the confines of my body, mind and soul, carried within me like a blessing, or like a parasite.

Blog Posts Champeau, Amy Essays Mind-Body Religion & Spirituality Society & Culture