Jungianthology: A Podcast & Blog Posts

Thank you to the Jung Association of Western Massachusetts and Marlow Shami for sharing this video of Anita Greene, PhD, discussing shame and contempt. From the video description:

Of all the archetypal affects in us, shame is the most toxic and the most human of all the emotions. Lewis Stewart, who reassessed Jung’s thoughts about affects, believes that contempt and shame are two sides of the same bipolar emotional dynamic whether one is on the giving or receiving end. Both are the response to alienation and rejection. Extreme contempt exudes a deprecating superiority. Extreme shame obliterates a sense of self-worth and authenticity. Clinical examples will illustrate how this bipolar dynamic operates in all of us.

Anita Greene, PhD, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and Rubenfeld Synergist, is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and teaches at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston. She has a private practice in Amherst.

The video was recorded by Marlow Shami.

Links: Jung Association of Western Mass Website | Marlow Shami’s YouTube Channel | Marlow Shami’s Website

Blog Posts Greene, Anita Seminars Shame

I would like to take some time to write about the psychological wisdom of a prayer -“The Lord’s Prayer”- that has guided the lives of millions of Catholic people around the world. My objective is to offer (like Edward Edinger did; see his book, “Transformation of the God-Image”) a brief psychological distillation (intra-psychic perspective) of that prayer.

First, here is the prayer:

“Our Father who art in Heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.”

From a psychological point of view, the relationship between our ego and the unconscious is important for our psychological well-being, especially the relationship between our consciousness and the center of the unconscious, which Analytical Psychology (Jung) calls the Self or the God Image in us. According to Jung, God is in each of us and that He/She is the center of the unconscious, which contains not only all the undiscovered and unknown potentials, talents, and abilities in each human life but, also, the dark aspects of human nature.

“Our Father who are in Heaven”

Then, what does the first sentence – “Our Father who are in Heaven” – mean psychologically?

It may mean that, inside of each of us, there is a place (Heaven) where all the undiscovered and unknown potentials, skills, talents, abilities as well as the dark aspects are located, and that the Creator of Life -God (Father)- as well as the fundamental impulse to create is there, too.

“Hallowed be Thy name”

What does this sentence mean psychologically?

The Self -God in us- is sacred. The prayer is asking people to declare the Self sacred and to view the inner center of our lives -the Self- as holy and whole. Given that the Self or God in us is dynamic center from where all psychological life begins -wishes, desires, thoughts, unknown potentials, undiscovered talents, and untapped skills- the second sentence of prayer is asking us to view and hold our psychological lives as sacred and divine. In a world where, unfortunately, outer reality seems to be the most important aspect of a human life, redeeming the “inner life and its center” as sacred seeks to restore the great psychological value of inner life.

Blog Posts Essays Religion & Spirituality Taborda, Freddie

Thank you to the Pacifica Graduate Institute for sharing this video. From the video description:

“You can’t define the sacred,” insists Pacifica professor and author, Dr. Lionel Corbett. “We can only talk about how we experience it. When C. G . Jung contemplated the sacred, he used the criteria of German theologian, Rudolf Otto, who described the experience of the sacred or the holy as “numinous”—that is, something that is mysterious, tremendous, or fascinating, having a powerful emotional quality beyond the ordinary or the everyday ego.” Pacifica alumna Bonnie Bright interviews Pacifica faculty member Dr. Lionel Corbett on Psyche and the Sacred. Dr. Corbett teaches in the Integrative Therapies and Healing Practices Specialization, the Jungian and Archetypal Studies Specialization and both doctoral programs in Clinical Psychology.

Lionel Corbett, MD is a professor of depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. His primary interests are: the religious function of the psyche, especially the way in which personal religious experience is relevant to individual psychology; the development of psychotherapy as a spiritual practice; and the interface of Jungian psychology and contemporary psychoanalytic thought. He is the author of numerous professional papers and four books: Psyche and the Sacred: Spirituality Beyond ReligionThe Religious Function of the PsycheThe Sacred Cauldron: Psychotherapy as a spiritual practice, and most recently The Soul in Anguish: Psychotherapeutic approaches to suffering.


Links: Lionel Corbett on the Jungianthology Podcast & Blog | Lionel Corbett’s lectures on the C. G. Jung Institite of Chicago Website | The Pacifica Graduate Institute YouTube Channel | The Pacifica Graduate Institute

Blog Posts Bright, Bonnie Corbett, Lionel Interviews

It is with deep sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Tom Kapacinskas, founding member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. Some excerpts from the obituary:

In 1975, together with the late June Singer of Chicago, Tom was a founding member of the Inter Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and their Training Institute, and in 1980 of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts and the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Tom lectured and presented seminars in the psychology of religion nationally and internationally, encouraging the development of the Lithuanian Jung Society in 1990.

Tom was a philosophical soul who loved reading, teaching, and seminars where ideas could be discussed… He was always mindful that each human being was in a terrible struggle for survival and, to the extent that he could, practiced kindness and compassion. He always hoped that his friends and family would cherish the wonderful experience of life.

Use the link below to read the full obituary, send flowers, and view information about memorial events.

Blog Posts Community News

with Robert Moore, PhD

Fall online programs are open for registration, including Dreaming in Times of Turmoil, Becoming Marcel Proust: Claiming Self in a Conflicted World, and a reading & consultation group for clinicians: Attachment, Affect Regulation and the Reflective Function in Analytical (Depth) Psychotherapy.

In light of the financial difficulties imposed by the pandemic, we are offering our online courses at 40% off our regular fee. You can support our efforts to make education accessible during this time by making a donation.

This episode is the first 90 minutes of the course Mythology of the Great Self Within. From the course description:

World mythological traditions present many images of a Great Self that dwells within each human individual. This course examines a number of these images from mythological and spiritual traditions and then turns to a discussion of the psychological basis for this phenomenon. Special attention is given to the implications for our experience of both pathological grandiosity and creative visioning.

It was recorded in 1993.

Robert Moore, PhD was Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Spirituality in the Graduate Center of the Chicago Theological Seminary where he was the Founding Director of the new Institute for Advanced Studies in Spirituality and Wellness. An internationally recognized psychoanalyst and consultant in private practice in Chicago, he served as a Training Analyst at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago and was Director of Research for the Institute for Integrative Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and the Chicago Center for Integrative Psychotherapy. Author and editor of numerous books in psychology and spirituality, he lectured internationally on his formulation of a neo-Jungian  psychoanalysis and integrative psychotherapy.  His publications include THE ARCHETYPE OF INITIATION: Sacred Space, Ritual Process and Personal TransformationTHE MAGICIAN AND THE ANALYST: The Archetype of the Magus in Occult Spirituality and Jungian Psychology; and FACING THE DRAGON: Confronting Personal and Spiritual Grandiosity.

For the complete series, CLICK HERE.
For all of Dr. Moore’s lectures, CLICK HERE.

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© 1993 Robert Moore. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law
Illustration: Wood carving from Amazon Indian Peoples


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Jungianthology Podcast Moore, Robert Myth/Fairytale Self and Self-Psychology Seminars