Jung, Wonder Woman, and the Psychology of Myth with Laura Vecchiolla


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Laura Vecchiolla, clinical psychologist and graduate of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Their discussion touches on:

  • Jung’s obsession with mythology
  • Mythology – Freud vs Jung
  • What does archetypal mean?
  • Image vs story
  • Wonder Woman
  • Hero’s journey
  • Glory seeking vs caretaking
  • Underestimation of women
  • Harry Potter/Hermione
  • Androgynous archetypes
  • Mainstream representation
  • Healing mythology
(more…)

Book Release | A People’s Guide to an Interfaith Christian Theology in a Time of Transformation

by Harvey Honig, PhD

Harvey H. Honig began his life’s work as a Lutheran minister but soon recognized his need for a more spacious and inclusive approach through which to heal and understand his inner self. This led him to spend many years exploring and experiencing other paths of religion and spirituality. In recent years, though, he found that the message, mission, and being of Jesus still played a powerful and transformative role in his life. Since common understandings of the life of Jesus are embedded within a biblical and historical framework, Honig wanted to explore the meaning of Christianity within the framework of our current world. An Interfaith Christian Theology is for fellow seekers who are drawn to the being and message of Jesus but can no longer relate to the dissonance between reality and belief that so many churches require. Honig’s approach differs from traditional Christian theology in two ways: first, it does not stem from the framework of a specific denomination, and second, it presents itself as a way of thinking about Christianity rather than the only way. After several years as a minister, Honig began Jungian analytic training and earned a PhD in psychology at Loyola University Chicago. Jung gave Honig the tools he needed to continue his personal search for a life-affirming view of Christianity and to assist others in their search for inner truth and healing.

Healing Cinema: The Lost Daughter


We’ve just launched our Spring Fundraising Drive! You can support this podcast and the Institute by making a donation of any amount. Due to a generous grant from the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts, the first $5,000 donated will be matched!

Jungian Analysts Judith Cooper and Daniel Ross discuss Maggie Gyllenhaal’s 2021 film The Lost Daughter (based on the 2006 novel of the same name by Elena Ferrante). They also reflect on the analysis provided in the article “Motherhood and Taboo: Recovering the Lost Daughter” from The Point. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • Transformation
  • Book vs Film
  • Maternal Ambivalence
  • Liminality
  • Lostness
  • Idealization vs Deidealization
  • Eroticism
  • Patriarchy
  • Achievement
  • Narcissism
  • Redemption
  • Pregnancy (Biological vs Psychological Impact)
  • Generational Trauma
  • Sadism
  • Aggression
  • Grief
(more…)

Letter from the President | May 20, 2022

Dear Friends of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago,

The Institute’s 2nd Annual Spring Fundraising Drive is here and I am inviting you to join with others in financially supporting the Institute.  Your donation will help ensure that our educational mission of training future analysts and educating psychology professionals and the general public continues. 

I’d like to share a personal story about why what the Institute does matters.   While attending psychological gatherings over the years, I have invariably heard in response to my saying that I am a Jungian psychoanalyst, “Really, does anyone do that anymore?” Imagine my surprise.  Yes, I do, the analyst-members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts do, and Jungian analysts worldwide do. 

This anecdote highlights the misperception that exists within the psychological field in this country about analytical psychology.  Your donation in support of our educational mission is tangible proof that the symbolic-depth approach of analytical psychology is relevant and is valued in today’s world. 

Analytical psychology was birthed out of the cataclysm of the Great War as Carl Jung sought to understand the promptings of psyche and make meaning of how such carnage and inhumanity could happen in the modern age.

Jung embarked on a journey within himself and the discoveries he made about psyche and psychic processes took him on outer world travels to gather the myths and symbol systems of other cultures.  These collective materials helped give shape to his psychology of the unconscious, one rooted in an archetypal collective unconscious.  

One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light,” Jung writes, “but by making the darkness conscious…a disagreeable and unpopular process.”  Addressing the darkness of the outer world requires that we each do our own inner shadow work so that our darkness is not projected onto others. Analytical psychology provides a way to understand and work with this reality of psyche and make meaning of what is discovered to more consciously navigate the inner and outer worlds.  Now more than ever, as the existential crises of the 21st century mount, there is a need for the education that the Institute provides. 

As a small non-profit, we do a lot with limited resources.  Your tax-deductible financial contribution adds needed income to revenue from tuition, the sale of our audio-lectures, and grants.  Equity donations are welcome.  The Institute has a Gold rating for financial transparency from GuideStar and is listed on Charity Navigator.   The Analytical Psychology Foundation of Chicago is a supporting organization.

Please join us in continuing to make possible analytical psychology education in Chicago and beyond by making a generous contribution to fund our educational mission.

Many thanks for your support, 

Stephanie Buck, President

Diversity Equity and Inclusion Statement of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago

The C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago acknowledges this country’s history of systemic racism and inequality and is committed to understanding and remediating these injustices through study and open discussion at all levels of our organization.  We are dedicated to applying the Jungian concepts of the collective shadow and the cultural complex to better understand how the toxic legacies of slavery, bigotry, and oppression of structural racism permeate our society, our institutions, and our collective and personal psyches. As practitioners of Jungian theory we strive to name and apply concepts of collective and personal shadow, cultural complex, manifested through the dynamics of projection, leading to “othering” and the denial of our shared humanity.  We endeavor to foster an atmosphere that respects, encourages, values and sincerely engages with diversity and difference in all its expressions and forms.  Our member analysts, public members and administrative staff actively support policies of inclusiveness and equity by raising these issues, concerns, and dynamics in classes and meetings.  As a community we also recognize and are mindful of Jung’s writings which contain harmful stereotypic descriptions of groups of people that are racially and culturally biased and prejudiced.  We pledge to initiate, welcome, and maintain ongoing conversations and discussions within our analyst community, with our trainees, and with our broader community of interested participants in all our programming regarding these depictions in Jung’s collective works. 

Jung, The Mythology of Pan, and Panic Culture: Interview with Ryan Maher


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Ryan Maher, MA, LMHC, LCPC, and graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Jungian Psychotherapy Program. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • Symbolism of the Forest in ancient and modern contexts
  • “Panic” and irrational states of mind
  • Paul Robichaud’s Pan: The Great God’s Modern Return
  • Self-regulation
  • Jung’s concept of reflection as an instinct
  • Dissociation from nature and instincts
  • Integration of the irrational
  • Transformation
  • James Hillman

Listener’s may be interested in Ryan’s presentation The Forest, The Witch & Pan – Psyche’s Need for Wilderness and Enchantment for the Myth Salon on YouTube, which is mentioned in this interview.

(more…)

Institute Archive | Edith Rockefeller McCormick: Philanthropist, Intellectual, Analyst


To celebrate International Women’s Day, we are sharing the seminar and panel discussion “Edith Rockefeller McCormick: Philanthropist, Intellectual, Analyst” in its entirety. The first hour is a presentation by Andrea Friederici Ross, author of Edith: The Rogue Rockefeller McCormick, followed by reflections by Kennon McKee, PhD, Jungian analyst and Victoria Drake, PhD, that opens up for general discussion.

(more…)

Healing Cinema: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Jungian Analysts Judith Cooper and Daniel Ross discuss Alejandro G. Iñárritu‘s 2014 film Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance). They touch on:

(more…)

Stefano Carpani | “Who was Carl Gustav Jung?” with Dr. John R. Haule

Dr. John Ryan Haule (1942, USA), is a Jungian Analyst, writer, & lecturer. He graduated from the C. G. Jung Institute Zurich in 1980 and is a NCPsyA, Certified Psychoanalyst as well as a Training Analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute-Boston. He works in his private practice in Massachusetts and is the author of books on Romantic Love, Therapy as Relationship, New Age Phenomena, and many articles on these topics, as well as shamanism, history of psychoanalysis, mysticism, and popular culture.

Listen to John Ryan Haule’s lecture, The Love Cure, from the Institute archives

Stefano Carpani M.A., M.Phil. (1978) is an Italian psychoanalyst-in-training (diploma candidate) at the C.G. Jung Institute Zurich and a Ph.D. candidate at the Centre for Psychoanalytical Studies, University of Essex (UK). He works in private practice in Berlin (DE).

Links: Stefano’s YouTube Channel | Stefano’s Website | John Ryan Haule at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago

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About Jungianthology

The Jungianthology Podcast offers free lectures from our archives and interviews with Jungian analysts and presenters at Institute programs.

The Jungianthology Blog shares essays, articles, video, audio, and other resources by members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts and other groups that support the education and development of our community.

The views and opinions expressed in the podcast and blog posts are those of the respected speakers or authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago.

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