Category: <span>Davidson, Adina</span>

This is part of a continuing series of posts from conversations with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


Lisa sent me a link to some long-term qualitative research being done by analysts who have been doing Teletherapy prior to the Covid 19 crisis. One of the issues they raised was whether Teletherapy brought an experience of banality into a sacred experience.

What makes our work sacred?

For me it is the times when I and my client or analysand experience the flow of healing that is beyond one ego talking to another ego. It seems that the connection or the field between the two of us opens a channel to something larger than either of us could have brought into the room. We experience the presence of the numinous. In Kabbalah or Jewish mystical tradition, this flow is called Shefa which can be translated as divine emanation or flow. Perhaps a analogous term more familiar in mainstream culture might be Grace.

In general, therapists and even analysts don’t talk a lot about this experience perhaps because it is so beyond our control but also because it is beyond language. By definition it is hard to talk about. At the same time, I would argue that without the presence of the numinous/Shefa/Grace there is no deep healing. With it there is sometimes change that seems miraculous or inexplicable.

Blog Posts COVID-19 Pandemic Current Events Davidson, Adina Essays

This is part of a a continuing series of posts from conversations with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


From Lisa, citing an episode of the podcast This Jungian Life:

The Quarantine/Stay-at-Home order is like the beginning of an alchemical transformation of the ego being broken down. It’s the beginning of a process of relativizing all our usual ego activities to something greater, fearful and not-fully-knowable.

As Jungians we tend to take a very optimistic view of the relativization of ego. We see it as a step in the path toward wholeness. Ego needs to see its proper (small) place in psyche in order for our conscious self to relate to the Self. This process of understanding our egoic limits is put into the context of growth and development.

I see this growth-oriented relativization of ego happening at times in myself and with my analysands even in this moment of uncertainty, fear and loss. I can sense (and my analysands report) moments of spaciousness and a larger peace that seems more available in all the time and quiet we have during quarantine.  I feel the important and valuable things – such as family conversations, the friendship of my life-partner, religious and secular ritual, creative work – in my bones. They strike my more-than-usually-open and vulnerable heart and easily bring me to tears. This can be framed as a solutio (the alchemical stage of dissolving a material into its constituent parts) process. Some of the ego defenses have been dissolved by the time-honored methods of being quiet and alone, terror and sadness. This dissolving opens space for an awareness of the larger realities.

Blog Posts COVID-19 Pandemic Current Events Davidson, Adina Essays

These are some notes from a conversation with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


First, we both were finding that conducting therapy/analysis virtually was shockingly exhausting and so were almost all of our colleagues. We had certain expectations of our ability to be productive between clients and found that both of us were staring vaguely into space or aimlessly snacking rather than taking a note, making a phone call, doing some writing, eating lunch etc.  We were interested in whether there might be a Jungian perspective that might help inform our understanding if not help rectify it.

My initial stab was that we were missing the “field” that exists between analyst and analysand and is the container for much of the therapy. Not only in the sense of the quasi-mystical field of collective unconscious and synchronicity but in the simple physiological data that we gather about each other unconsciously. The micro shifts in facial expression, the half-heard sighs or in breaths, the subtle changes in body language. All of this is missing or limited when we view each other through a computer screen. Our conscious egoic self must carry all the burden of the communication with no help from our instinctive or intuitive understanding of what the person is communicating non-verbally.

Blog Posts COVID-19 Pandemic Current Events Davidson, Adina

Fanny Brewster, PhD, MFA, LP , was scheduled to be the keynote speaker at this year’s Founders’ Day Symposium on March 21st. The event has since been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Fanny Brewster is a Jungian analyst, and a professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is a writer of nonfiction including African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows (Routledge, 2017), Archetypal Grief: Slavery’s Legacy of Intergenerational Child Loss (Routledge, 2018) and The Racial Complex: A Jungian Perspective on Culture and Race (Routledge, 2019). Her poems have been published in Psychological Perspectives Journal where she was the Featured Poet. Dr. Brewster is an international lecturer and workshop presenter on Jungian related topics that address Culture, Diversity, and Creativity. She is a faculty member at the New York C. G. Jung Foundation and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts.  

She is interviewed by Adina Davidson, PhD. Dr. Davidson is a Jungian Analyst in Cleveland, Ohio, member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts, and recent graduate of our Analyst Training Program.


For more information about our Founders’ Day Symposium, click here.


This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law


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Brewster, Fanny Complexes Davidson, Adina Dreams Interviews Jung's Life Jungianthology Podcast

Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW, NCPsyA, the Director of Training at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, interviews two Jungian Psychoanalysts and recent graduates of our Analyst Training Program (ATP), Adina Davidson, PhD, and Dan Ross, RN, PMHNP, MSN, MBA, about why they chose to commit to Jungian work and how it has change their practices.

The Analyst Training Program prepares experienced, licensed clinicians to become certified as Jungian psychoanalysts through an in-depth understanding of the theory and practice of analytical psychology grounded in personal analysis and clinical consultation.

The Process of Analytic Training is both educational and transformational, and frequently leads to significant personal development and psychological deepening. The program fosters mutual development and psychological awareness within an intimate learning community of candidates and analysts. Upon graduation, candidates have an appreciation of the symbolic attitude within the interactive field of analysis and a working understanding of transference dynamics within the analytic relationship.

The Curriculum is organized thematically around the reading of Jung’s seminal writings as well as subsequent developments in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis. Courses in theory and practice are likewise organized around major themes that include the structure and complexity of the psyche, the mythic patterns of archetypal potentials and dynamics, the capacity to work with the symbolic meaning of dreams, and a practical grasp of the mutual transformation of analyst and client within the interactive transferential field of analysis.  Case seminars, case colloquia, dream practica, and group process ground the thematic and course materials in personal and clinical experience. The curriculum extends over a four-year course of study taught on nine three-day weekends each year.

The Program is designed to make analytic training available to all qualified applicants. The one-weekend-a-month structure allows training to fit into one’s professional life, whether or not you live in the Chicago area. Our location in “the loop” has convenient access to public transportation, both O’Hare and Midway airports, and Union Metra/Amtrak train station. We have discount rates at Club Quarters Hotel and tuition assistance is available to those in financial need. All classes and events are accessible.

Certification of the C.G. Jung Institute to train analysts is granted by The International Association of Analytical Psychology. The Institute is accredited as a psychoanalytic training institute by the The American Board for Accreditation in Psychoanalysis, Inc.

Applications to the Analyst Training Program are currently being accepted for the 2020-2021 training year. The deadline to apply is January 15th, 2020. To learn more about the program, the institute, and to download an application, visit our website.

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This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Davidson, Adina Interviews Jungianthology Podcast Ross, Dan