Myth/Fairytale

Jungian Ever After | Rumpelstiltskin Part 1: Narcissism and Persona

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Rumpelstiltskin is a character the we love from the show Once Upon a Time, but the original story isn’t commonly consumed. We have split our analysis once more into two parts. This first one covers narcissism and persona while part 2 will focus solely on the Trickster archetype.

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Jung in the World | Mythology and the Age of the Heroine with Maria Tatar


Renowned folklorist and Harvard scholar Maria Tatar joins host Patricia Martin to discuss her latest book, Heroine with 1,001 Faces. In this interview, Tatar unearths the forgotten legacy of the heroine’s quest, which parallels Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey, and illuminates the social significance of the heroine as an archetype for our times.

The video of this interview is available on YouTube.

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Jungian Ever After | Cinderella Part 1: Grief


One of the most popular fairy tales, Cinderella, especially as told by Grimm, contains two major themes. So, we’ve split our analysis into 2 parts. This first episode speaks of the healing power of grief, while next month we will discuss the role of envy.

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Jungian Ever After | Rapunzel


We begin our Grimm journey with the story of Rapunzel! A tale of irresponsible parents, a tower of isolation with no stairs or door, and the persecutor/protector that exists in all of us.

The story reading takes place from 9:22 to 18:18

We’ll be reading from Household Tales by Brothers Grimm

Adina also recommends:

The Inner World of Trauma by Donald Kalshed

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Jungian Ever After | Introduction


We are adding a new show to Jungianthology! Jungian Ever After is a new show co-hosted by Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts member Adina Davidson and Raisa Cabrera. It’s a podcast about fairy tales through the lens of Jungian analysis. Jungian Ever After will be shared on our feed alongside our other shows. They have 7 episodes so far, so it will take a little bit for our feed to catch up with theirs, but we will! If you want to listen to all of their published episodes right now, go to Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or search for “Jungian Ever After” in your favorite podcast app.

Allow us to introduce ourselves and why we’re making this show!

We’ll be reading from Household Tales by Brothers Grimm

Adina also recommends: The Complete Grimm’s Fairy Tales (Pantheon Fairy Tale And Folklore Library). If attempting to purchase this, be sure it says, “with Padraic Colum (intro) and Joseph Campbell (commentary) and James Scharl (illustr)”. Amazon considers all versions to be the same book, so you could accidentally buy a copy without those key elements.


Email: jungianeverafter@gmail.com

Twitter: @JEA_Podcast

Discord: https://discord.gg/GEdn4TPgHR

Ko-fi: https://ko-fi.com/jungianeverafter

Freddie Taborda | What the Dead May Teach the Living About the Individuation Process: A Jungian Perspective About an Aboriginal Necropolis

Death was sacred to some aboriginal people in Colombia. Near the town of San Agustin and Isnos, the journey to death called for a necropolis to be built by unknown indigenous tribes. Approximately more than 2000 years ago, funerary mounds, megalithic, anthropomorphic, anthropozoomorphic, and zoomorphic statues, funerary corridors, and stone slab tombs were constructed beneath the earth! Earth mounds covered stone slab dolmens that contained the dead body of important people who had natural powers or occupied important roles in their tribe (Instituto Colombiano de Antropologia e Historia-ICANH, 2011). We know very little about who these tribes were and why they abandoned this area by the 14th and 15th century. The indigenous people who currently live near this area do not seem to have a direct racial lineage with these Colombian ancestors.

Why do these aboriginal people construct and bury these “death-related” sites underground? What is the meaning of the anthropomorphic, anthrozoomorphic, and zoomophic stone sculptures? This brief article attempts to provide a psychological hypothesis to these questions, from an Analytical (Jungian) Psychology perspective, in order to emphasize “ancestral wisdom” (Leon, 2010) of indigenous for modern times.

This post was first published on thehealingpsyche.org.

Freddie Taborda, LCPC, PsyD is a Jungian Analyst with over 30 years of clinical experience. He maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois.


Links: Dr. Taborda’s Website | About Dr. Taborda | Dr. Taborda’s Page on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Website

Institute Archive | The Warrior Within: A Study in Masculine Psychology with Robert Moore, PhD

This episode is the first session of the series The Warrior Within: A Study in Masculine Psychology, a classic seminar in his series on the four major archetypes of masculine psychology as he understood them: King, Warrior, Magician, Lover. From the seminar description:

The Warrior is the archetype of self-disciplined, aggressive action. If Warrior energy is not accessed properly, a man may find himself caught up in cruel or self-destructive behavior. The mature Warrior, however, will be energetic, decisive and persevering in reaching his goals.  The course is divided into the following four topics:

• The Warrior in myth, folklore and religion
• The Warrior’s role in masculine creativity and leadership
• Psychopathology of the Warrior
• Creating the “Rainbow Warrior”: resources for healing the Warrior

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Jung in the World | Jung, Wonder Woman, and the Psychology of Myth with Laura Vecchiolla


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Laura Vecchiolla, clinical psychologist and graduate of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Their discussion touches on:

  • Jung’s obsession with mythology
  • Mythology – Freud vs Jung
  • What does archetypal mean?
  • Image vs story
  • Wonder Woman
  • Hero’s journey
  • Glory seeking vs caretaking
  • Underestimation of women
  • Harry Potter/Hermione
  • Androgynous archetypes
  • Mainstream representation
  • Healing mythology
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Jung in the World: Jung, The Mythology of Pan, and Panic Culture: Interview with Ryan Maher


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Ryan Maher, MA, LMHC, LCPC, and graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Jungian Psychotherapy Program. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • Symbolism of the Forest in ancient and modern contexts
  • “Panic” and irrational states of mind
  • Paul Robichaud’s Pan: The Great God’s Modern Return
  • Self-regulation
  • Jung’s concept of reflection as an instinct
  • Dissociation from nature and instincts
  • Integration of the irrational
  • Transformation
  • James Hillman

Listener’s may be interested in Ryan’s presentation The Forest, The Witch & Pan – Psyche’s Need for Wilderness and Enchantment for the Myth Salon on YouTube, which is mentioned in this interview.

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Jung in the World | C. G. Jung & the Modernist Revolution with Roula-Maria Dib


During our Holiday Giving Drive we are presenting a series of interviews called Jung in the World. In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Roula-Maria Dib, creative writer and literary scholar, who views Carl Jung as a modernist and has written about the power of the modernist moment in history to give rise to the discipline of psychology. Her book, Jungian Metaphor in Modernist Literature, creates a new context for understanding Carl Jung’s work and his most important theories: the context of the collective in which he lived. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • The development of Modernism
  • Finding wholeness through art
  • Jung’s Collected Works & his literary sense
  • Active imagination
  • The symbol
  • The collective unconscious
  • Deconstruction and integration
  • Reading the Jungian way
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Institute Archive | The Myth of Shadow and the Shadow of Myth with Nathan Schwartz-Salant


Mythology can help us to understand and integrate the shadow, but this endeavor can also be undermined by the use of mythology. In particular, the limiting madness of the shadow can be denied, and with this denial one can lose a sense of soul and embodied life. Schwartz-Salant examines the nature of madness and evil and the means of coming to terms with these powerful elements of the shadow. The keynote lecture of the conference Gold in Dark Places: Shadow Work in the Struggle for Selfhood, which includes the following lectures:

  1. The Myth of the Shadow and the Shadow of Myth – Nathan Schwartz-Salant
  2. The Typological Counterculture: Introverted Feeling and its Allies – John Giannini
  3. The Vampire Archetype and Vampiric Relationships – Julie McAfee
  4. World Oppression and the Power of Transformation – John Van Eenwyk
  5. The Wounding Shadow of the Wounded Healer: Narcissism and Co-Dependency in the Helping Professions – Jean Shinoda Bolen
  6. Shadows on the Rock: Women, Violence, and the Church – Joan Chamberlain Engelsman
  7. Depth Psychology and Politics: Reflections on the Mythopoetic Men’s Movement – Andrew Samuels
  8. Shadow Issues in the Daughter’s Father Complex – Julia Jewett
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