Society & Culture

Vlado Solc | QAnon: Eclipse of the Soul

“In an odd way, the conspiracy theorist’s view is both frightening and reassuring. It is frightening because it magnifies the power of evil, leading in some cases to an outright dualism in which light and darkness struggle for cosmic supremacy. At the same time, however, it is reassuring, for it promises a world that is meaningful rather than arbitrary. Not only are events nonrandom, but the clear identification of evil gives the conspiracist a definable enemy against which to struggle, endowing life with purpose.” (Michael Barkun 2003)

Odysseus’ Shipwreck

In the Homeric Opus, the embattled and traumatized Odysseus is shipwrecked at Ogygia Island: “Then, all at once Zeus thundered and hit the ship with a lightning bolt. Smitten by Zeus’ bolt, the ship spun around and was filled with sulphurous fumes. My shipmates fell out of the ship, and, like seahawks, they were carried by waves past the black ship” (Homer, 1871, p. 12.407–19).

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Jung in the World | Fundamentalism’s Dark Side: A Jungian View with George Didier & Vladislav Šolc


Two Jungian analysts discuss fundamentalism, shadow, and a new way forward. George Didier and Vlado Šolc, authors of the book Dark Religion: Fundamentalism from the Perspective of Jungian Psychology, join Patricia Martin for a conversation about the psychology of religion as a destructive force and why it is important to understand the shadow side of fundamentalism.

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Healing Cinema | Tár

Transcript: HTML | PDF


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Jungian Analysts Judith Cooper and Daniel Ross discuss Tár, the 2022 film written and directed by Todd Field. It stars Cate Blanchett as Lydia Tár, a renowned conductor who is accused of sexual misconduct.

This episode is a pilot of our transcription process. If you have any feedback about the transcript, please email jung@jungchicago.org.

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Jung in the World | Technology & the Self 2: Finding Ourselves in a Digital Culture with Elizabeth Nelson

Video Available on YouTube


Elizabeth Eowyn Nelson, PhD joins Patricia Martin for a lively conversation about the value of Jungian thought in our tech-centric times. Nelson is on the faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, where she is a scholar on dreams, technology, and cultural studies. In this episode, she brings a wealth of insight to our contemporary moment, exploring what it means to pursue personal growth in a digital culture.

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Freddie Taborda | What the Dead May Teach the Living About the Individuation Process: A Jungian Perspective About an Aboriginal Necropolis

Death was sacred to some aboriginal people in Colombia. Near the town of San Agustin and Isnos, the journey to death called for a necropolis to be built by unknown indigenous tribes. Approximately more than 2000 years ago, funerary mounds, megalithic, anthropomorphic, anthropozoomorphic, and zoomorphic statues, funerary corridors, and stone slab tombs were constructed beneath the earth! Earth mounds covered stone slab dolmens that contained the dead body of important people who had natural powers or occupied important roles in their tribe (Instituto Colombiano de Antropologia e Historia-ICANH, 2011). We know very little about who these tribes were and why they abandoned this area by the 14th and 15th century. The indigenous people who currently live near this area do not seem to have a direct racial lineage with these Colombian ancestors.

Why do these aboriginal people construct and bury these “death-related” sites underground? What is the meaning of the anthropomorphic, anthrozoomorphic, and zoomophic stone sculptures? This brief article attempts to provide a psychological hypothesis to these questions, from an Analytical (Jungian) Psychology perspective, in order to emphasize “ancestral wisdom” (Leon, 2010) of indigenous for modern times.

This post was first published on thehealingpsyche.org.

Freddie Taborda, LCPC, PsyD is a Jungian Analyst with over 30 years of clinical experience. He maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois.


Links: Dr. Taborda’s Website | About Dr. Taborda | Dr. Taborda’s Page on the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Website

Jung in the World | Jung, Wonder Woman, and the Psychology of Myth with Laura Vecchiolla


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Laura Vecchiolla, clinical psychologist and graduate of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Their discussion touches on:

  • Jung’s obsession with mythology
  • Mythology – Freud vs Jung
  • What does archetypal mean?
  • Image vs story
  • Wonder Woman
  • Hero’s journey
  • Glory seeking vs caretaking
  • Underestimation of women
  • Harry Potter/Hermione
  • Androgynous archetypes
  • Mainstream representation
  • Healing mythology
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Healing Cinema: The Lost Daughter


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Jungian Analysts Judith Cooper and Daniel Ross discuss Maggie Gyllenhaal’s 2021 film The Lost Daughter (based on the 2006 novel of the same name by Elena Ferrante). They also reflect on the analysis provided in the article “Motherhood and Taboo: Recovering the Lost Daughter” from The Point. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • Transformation
  • Book vs Film
  • Maternal Ambivalence
  • Liminality
  • Lostness
  • Idealization vs Deidealization
  • Eroticism
  • Patriarchy
  • Achievement
  • Narcissism
  • Redemption
  • Pregnancy (Biological vs Psychological Impact)
  • Generational Trauma
  • Sadism
  • Aggression
  • Grief
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Jung in the World: Jung, The Mythology of Pan, and Panic Culture: Interview with Ryan Maher


In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Ryan Maher, MA, LMHC, LCPC, and graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago’s Jungian Psychotherapy Program. In this discussion, they touch on:

  • Symbolism of the Forest in ancient and modern contexts
  • “Panic” and irrational states of mind
  • Paul Robichaud’s Pan: The Great God’s Modern Return
  • Self-regulation
  • Jung’s concept of reflection as an instinct
  • Dissociation from nature and instincts
  • Integration of the irrational
  • Transformation
  • James Hillman

Listener’s may be interested in Ryan’s presentation The Forest, The Witch & Pan – Psyche’s Need for Wilderness and Enchantment for the Myth Salon on YouTube, which is mentioned in this interview.

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About Jungianthology

Jungianthology Radio is home to a variety of podcasts that range from archival seminar recordings (Institute Archives), to interviews (Jung in the World) to discussion on film (Healing Cinema), fairy tales (Jungian Ever After), and our programs.

The Jungianthology Blog shares essays, articles, video, audio, and other resources by members of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts and other groups that support the education and development of our community.

The views and opinions expressed in the podcasts and blog posts are those of the respected speakers or authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago.

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