Category: <span>Mind-Body</span>

Dr. Alfred Ribi and Stefano Carpani met in Erlenbach (Zurich) in February 2017. This is a 45 minutes conversation on C.G. Jung, M.L. Von Franz, Alchemy and the relevance of Analytical Psychology today.

Dr. Alfred Ribi (1931) is a Swiss Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist. In 1963, he began analysis with Marie-Louise von Franz and worked closely with her ever since. Stefano Carpani M.A. M.Phil. (1978), is an Italian Psychoanalyst-in-Training (diploma candidate) at the C.G. Jung Institute Zurich and a PhD Researcher at the Centre for Psychoanalytical Studies, University of Essex (UK).

Stefano’s YouTube Channel | Stefano’s Website

Archetypes Blog Posts Carpani, Stefano Interviews Mind-Body Ribi, Alfred Society & Culture Video

“We continue to speak, if only in whispers, to something inside us that
wants to be named.”

Dorianne Laux, “Dark Chants,” Only as the Day is Long.

My name is Chaika Runya bat Yitzchak v’ Channa Gittl. This is my ‘Hebrew’ name, my sacred name, my Yiddish name, my hidden name, my underground name, the name that binds me to family lineage and tradition and to my people, going all the way back to the beginning of time. This is the name I am called in Jewish ritual, when I have an aliyah to give a blessing over the Torah or when I am invited to the pulpit to read the Torah, or when I am a witness to someone immersing herself in the sacred baths in order to convert to Judaism.

I am named for two great aunts who were murdered in the Holocaust.

Most mornings of my life, since I was younger than six years old, I’ve woken in terror, heart beating fast, body sweating. In an effort to calm myself I’d listen to music or focus on my breathing before opening my eyes to start the day. Each morning the fear would dissolve as I moved into the day’s activities, only to return the next.

One morning, not long ago I decided to turn toward the fear and terror rather than away, to be curious about it, to explore it, to get to know it. I curled up in the fetal position in bed, tuning in to the sensations I experienced physically. I became aware of a feeling like electric jolts pounding and jumping in my chest and arms. I asked the sensations, “What is the message held in my body?”

What I heard them say was this: “Life is not safe.”

My mother tells me my aunts, Chaika and Runya, the younger sisters of my mother’s father, were shot, killed and buried in a mass grave in then Austria-Hungary during the Holocaust. In my mind’s eye, here is how I imagine them: They are two young women, maybe in their 20s; their light brown hair hangs in braids down their backs, each wears a dark wool dress, a cream-colored pinafore, woolen knee-high socks and sturdy shoes. They stand with their family and friends and fellow-townspeople, all of whom have been herded out of their homes, their beds, and lined up at the town’s edge, in rows, ahead of them the deep pit into which their lifeless bodies will be tossed, one on top of another, like sacks of potatoes, to be covered with dirt, and erased.

I imagine dogs barking wildly and the loud yelling of male voices in a language my aunts and their friends and family don’t understand. They do understand what will happen to them. I imagine the rifle shots as faceless men mechanically shoot them from behind, one by one, and I imagine the unbearable, unimaginable terror of waiting as your turn comes, hearing the screams, hearing the heavy plop as each body falls into the pit, witnessing your loved ones’ deaths, knowing your inescapable fate, waiting to feel pain, feeling the bullet entering your chest from the back, breathing your last breath, collapsing and tumbling, finally, into the pit. In their names, their stories, their lives, their deaths take residence within the confines of my body, mind and soul, carried within me like a blessing, or like a parasite.

Blog Posts Champeau, Amy Essays Mind-Body Religion & Spirituality Society & Culture

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first part of the series The Way of the Sly One: The Psychology of Our Possible Evolution in the Writings of Gurdjieff, Ouspensky, & Jung.

Most depth psychological theories look backward into the personal history of the individual in order to find the causes for neurotic symptoms, gain insight into their persistence in the present, and diminish their effects in the future. A key feature of Jungian psychology is the addition of a forward focus, a constructive, teleological emphasis on the meaning of symptoms, and the need to discover what the symptom is calling the sufferer to notice and change. This places Jung in a category of psychological practitioners who seek to promote the possible evolution of the person from present status to future transcendence.

Russian spiritual teacher G.I. Gurdjieff sought to bring his students to a place of consciousness that went far beyond what was generally thought of as “being awake”. The core of his teaching, that humankind was unfinished and did not possess a soul but was capable of creating one through intense inner work, created discomfort in his followers and stimulated them to find ways to break through to new levels of awareness – a method he called “the way of the sly one”. P.D. Ouspensky, Gurdjieff’s foremost disciple, also taught about the possible evolution of human consciousness and provided a more systematized interpretation of Gurdjieff’s teachings.

Ken James, PhD maintains a private practice in Chicago, Illinois.  His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, and ways to sustain the vital relationship between body, mind and spirit.  He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy, the Kabbalah, spirituality and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here
For all seminars by Ken James, click here


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

Individuation James, Ken Jungianthology Podcast Mind-Body Religion & Spirituality Self and Self-Psychology Seminars Transformation

with Murray Stein, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Jungian Psyche: A Deeper Look at Analytical Psychology. The course, recorded in 1991, offers a careful exploration of some of Jung’s key theoretical texts. Aimed at giving the advanced student of analytical psychology a greater appreciation of the details of Jung’s theoretical model of the psyche, the class proceeds in a systematic fashion through the basic concepts and considers how they interrelate to form a whole. Suggested readings from Jung’s Collected Works are announced at the start of each class section. During this talk Dr. Stein discusses Jung’s Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self and Psychological Types, the theory, historical use, and emergence of the term ego, and the theory of complexes.

stein_murrayMurray Stein, PhD is a training analyst at the International School for Analytical Psychology in Zurich, Switzerland. His most recent publications include The Principle of Individuation, Jung’s Map of the Soul, and The Edinburgh International Encyclopaedia of Psychoanalysis (Editor of the Jungian sections, with Ross Skelton as General Editor). He lectures internationally on topics related to Analytical Psychology and its applications in the contemporary world. Dr. Stein is a graduate of Yale University (B.A. and M.Div.), the University of Chicago (Ph.D., in Religion and Psychological Studies), and the C.G. Jung Institut-Zurich. He is a founding member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. He has been the president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (2001-4), and is presently a member of the Swiss Society for Analytical Psychology and President of the International School of Analytical Psychology, Zurich.


For the complete series, click here.

To browse all of Dr. Stein’s lectures, click here.

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© 1991 Murray Stein. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman

Archetypes Complexes Jung's Life Jungianthology Podcast Mind-Body Self and Self-Psychology Seminars Stein, Murray Typology

Beastwith Anita Greene, Ph.D.

Anita Greene, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Amherst Massachusetts, and a teacher at the C.G. Jung Institute in Boston. She is also a Rubenfeld Synergist who combines gentle body techniques within her analytic work. She lectures widely on the integration of body and psyche.

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Creative Commons License
© Anita Greene. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Episode music is by Michael Chapman

Gender & Sexuality Greene, Anita Jungianthology Podcast Mind-Body Myth/Fairytale Seminars Transformation