Tag: Ego

with Ken James, PhD

This episode is the first session of the four-part series The Path is the Goal: Walking the Way of Individuation.

Jung called individuation the method by which a person becomes a separate unity or whole. In Jungian psychology, individuation has sometimes been called the goal of the analytic process. This terminology can be misleading since individuation is not a product, but a process in which we are engaged throughout our lives. The mysterious process of individuation is the focus of this course. Engaging lecture and reflection on Jung’s Collected Works provide an understanding of the nature of individuation as well as ways to enhance and foster that process. It was recorded in 1997.

A diagram is referenced is the talk which is probably this one. Though not explicitly described as being between analyst and analysand, the structure is essentially the same.

Ken James, PhD is director of Student Services at the Laboratory School, University of Chicago. His areas of expertise include dream work and psychoanalysis, archetypal dimensions of analytic practice, divination and synchronicity, hypnosis as a therapeutic medium, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. He has done post-doctoral work in music therapy and theology, and uses these disciplines to inform his work as a Jungian analyst. For more information visit soulworkcenter.org

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by Ken James, click here.


© 1997 Ken James. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

with John Beebe, MD

This episode is the first hour of the seminar A New Model of Psychological Types.

Jung’s theory of psychological types is an attempt to make comprehensible the regular differences between individuals. His concepts of introversion and extraversion, thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition have gained wide currency since their introduction in 1920. However, applying these concepts to practical situations is often confusing. Dr. Beebe’s new model of typology shows how the eight types relate to complexes that can be recognized in dreams and styles of behavior. The model, which permits the types to be recognized more easily and with more precision, is illustrated with examples drawn from clinical work and works of creative imagination. It was recorded in 1988.

The following diagram outlines Beebe’s framework (click image to enlarge):

John Beebe, MD, a physician specializing in psychotherapy, is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a past president of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. He is the author of Integrity in Depth, editor of C. G. Jung’s Aspects of the Masculine, and co-author of The Presence of the Feminine in Film. He is the founding editor of The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal (now titled Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche), and a was the first American co-editor of the London-based Journal of Analytical Psychology. An international lecturer, Beebe is widely known for his work on psychological types, the psychology of moral process, and the Jungian understanding of film. Recently he has been engaged in training the first generation of analytical psychologists in China.

For the complete series, click here.
For all seminars by John Beebe, click here.


© 1988 John Beebe. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

fairytalesimage-500x500with Lois Khan, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Psychology of Fairy Tales.

“Fairy tales are the purest and simplest expression of collective unconscious processes… They represent the archetypes in their simplest, barest, and most concise form … [and] afford us the best clues to the understanding of the processes going on in the collective psyche.” — Marie-Louise von Franz

This series examines the psychological richness of the fairy tale. Each recording in the series focuses on a single fairy tale and explores the tale’s insight into a particular psychological theme and inner logic. It was recorded in 1991.

Suggested readings:

Lois Khan, PhD was a practicing psychoanalyst in the Chicago area and Tennessee for almost 50 years. She also taught at the University of Chicago, in addition to lecturing as a psychologist throughout the world.

For the complete series, click here.
For more seminars by Dr. Khan, click here.


© 1991 Lois Khan. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman

with Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW

This episode is part one of the series Terror, Evil, and Loss of the Self. In this seminar, Brenda Donahue discusses how survivors of childhood deprivation or physical and sexual abuse routinely describe themselves as freaks, existing outside of normal human relations because they feel evil or bad. This is because the child victim takes the evil of the abuser into him/herself in order to preserve the primary attachment to the parents. This sense of badness or evil becomes a staple of the personality structure, and many survivors spend their lives refusing to be absolved of blame. This course presents basic concepts from analytical psychology and shows how they can be useful in the treatment of post-traumatic stress syndrome. It was recorded in 1994.

Brenda Donahue, RN, LCSW is a Jungian analyst in private practice in the western suburbs of Chicago and author of C. G. Jung’s Complex Dynamics and the Clinical Relationship: One Map for Mystery.

For the complete series, click here.

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© 1994 Brenda Donahue. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman

with Murray Stein, PhD

This episode is part one of the series The Jungian Psyche: A Deeper Look at Analytical Psychology. The course, recorded in 1991, offers a careful exploration of some of Jung’s key theoretical texts. Aimed at giving the advanced student of analytical psychology a greater appreciation of the details of Jung’s theoretical model of the psyche, the class proceeds in a systematic fashion through the basic concepts and considers how they interrelate to form a whole. Suggested readings from Jung’s Collected Works are announced at the start of each class section. During this talk Dr. Stein discusses Jung’s Aion: Researches into the Phenomenology of the Self and Psychological Types, the theory, historical use, and emergence of the term ego, and the theory of complexes.

stein_murrayMurray Stein, Ph.D. is a training analyst at the International School for Analytical Psychology in Zurich, Switzerland. His most recent publications include The Principle of Individuation, Jung’s Map of the Soul, and The Edinburgh International Encyclopaedia of Psychoanalysis (Editor of the Jungian sections, with Ross Skelton as General Editor). He lectures internationally on topics related to Analytical Psychology and its applications in the contemporary world. Dr. Stein is a graduate of Yale University (B.A. and M.Div.), the University of Chicago (Ph.D., in Religion and Psychological Studies), and the C.G. Jung Institut-Zurich. He is a founding member of the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts. He has been the president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (2001-4), and is presently a member of the Swiss Society for Analytical Psychology and President of the International School of Analytical Psychology, Zurich.

For the complete series, click here.

To browse all of Dr. Stein’s lectures, click here.

Creative Commons License
© 1991 Murray Stein. This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.

Music by Michael Chapman