Davidson, Adina

Jungian Ever After | Rapunzel


We begin our Grimm journey with the story of Rapunzel! A tale of irresponsible parents, a tower of isolation with no stairs or door, and the persecutor/protector that exists in all of us.

The story reading takes place from 9:22 to 18:18

We’ll be reading from Household Tales by Brothers Grimm

Adina also recommends:

The Inner World of Trauma by Donald Kalshed

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Jung in the World | Learning as a Path to Individuation: Interview with JPP/JSP Directors Adina Davidson & Andrea Gaspar Gonzalez

This is the second weekly episode we are releasing as part of out spring fundraising drive, Grow With Us. You can support this podcast and help us reach our $10,000 goal by making a donation. You can also support us by becoming a member of the Institute or making a purchase in our online store.

In this episode, Patricia Martin interviews Adina Davidson, PhD & Andrea Gaspar Gonzalez, PsyD, directors of the upcoming Jungian Psychotherapy Program (JPP) and Jungian Studies Program (JSP), about the process of individuation in this cultural moment. It’s a lively discussion about self-development during moments of crisis: What is necessary to integrate painful realizations, and what happens if we don’t? What do we need, as individuals and as groups, to follow the individuation process, rather than retreating into persona? For those interested in the programs, both Adina and Andrea discuss their philosophies of teaching and explain what to expect.

Adina Davidson, PhD is a Jungian analyst practicing in Cleveland, Ohio. She trained at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago and graduated in September 2019. She is particularly interested in the ways we personally and collectively make meaning of our lives through telling our stories.

Andrea Gaspar Gonzalez, PsyD is a clinical psychologist practicing in the Chicagoland area, with a focus on the treatment of trauma and sexual abuse. She is a recent Fellow of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program (2018–2020) and graduate of the Jungian Studies Program (2014–2016) at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago. Her current research is focused on collective psyche, application of Jung’s theories to the present cultural climate, and re-examining archetype and archetypal material, especially as it relates to the concept of the feminine, from a fourth-wave feminist standpoint.

Patricia Martin is a cultural analyst, consultant, and the author of three books on cultural trends. As a consultant, Martin has worked on teams at Discovery Communications, Dannon, Microsoft, Ms. Foundation for Women, Oracle, Unisys, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the New York Philharmonic, to name a few. Her work has been featured in the New York TimesHarvard Business ReviewUSA Today, and Advertising Age. A blogger since 2002, Martin was a regular contributor to Huffington Post during its start-up years. She earned a B.A. in English and sociology from Michigan State University and an M.A. in Irish literature and culture from the University College Dublin. Later, she built a foundation for her cultural analysis by studying Jungian theory and depth psychology at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago, where she is currently a Professional Affiliate and member of the program committee. In 2017, she harnessed artificial intelligence to uncover the effects of the internet on our sense of self. A book on her findings entitled Will the Future Like You? is due out later in 2021. Martin speaks worldwide about cultural changes that are shaping the future and the impact of the digital culture on the collective. A native of Detroit, Martin works in Chicago and lives in an ancient forest near the shores of Lake Michigan with her husband and countless deer.

Thank you to everyone who shared a little bit about themselves since the last episode. If you’d like us to know who you are, click this link, and I’ll read your submission on the podcast! No need to share any identifying information. This information will not be used for any other purpose.

You can support this free podcast by making a donation, becoming a member of the Institute, or making a purchase in our online store. Your support enables us to provide free and low-cost educational resources to all.

Links
The Jungian Psychotherapy Program (JPP) & Jungian Studies Program (JSP)
Adina Davidson’s page at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago
Andrea Gaspar Gonzalez’s page at the C. G. Jung Institute of Chicago


This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Executive Producer: Ben Law
Producer: Patricia Martin
Music: Michael Chapman


Thank you to our 2020 donors who gave at the Contributing Member level and above: Barbara Annan, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Jackie Cabe Bryan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Kevin Davis, George J. Didier, James Fidelibus, John Korolewski, Marty Manning, Dyane Sherwood, Deborah P. Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner, Karen West and James Taylor, and Ellen Young. If you would like to support this podcast, click here to join our community of supporters.

Memories, Dreams Reflections: Exploring the Depths, a 6-Month Online Program

Arlo Compaan, co-chair of the Institute’s Program Committee and past Director of Training, interviews the facilitators of our new six-month online program Memories, Dreams, Reflections: Exploring the Depths. In this monthly online weekend program, Jungian analysts and experts will introduce the major themes of Analytical Psychology as Carl Jung developed them across his life, beginning in his early 20s and ending in his 80s. Through presentations, facilitated large and small group interaction, and paired experiential exercises, we will explore these themes from Jung’s writings in relationship to the events of his life and then connected to our contemporary experiences.

By following Jung into the depths of his experience, we will deepen our understanding of these themes in our lives:

  • Adaptation to our inner world and to the outer world
  • The relationship between spirit and matter
  • The individual and collective unconscious
  • The relationship of consciousness (ego) to the Self
  • Daily life and dream life, images, and symbols

The program will run from January through June, 2021. This interview was recorded in October 2020.

Adina Davidson, PhD is a Jungian analyst practicing in Cleveland, Ohio. She trained at the C G Jung Institute of Chicago and graduated in September 2019. She is particularly interested in the ways we personally and collectively make meaning of our lives through telling our stories.

Andrea Gaspar Gonzalez, PsyD is a clinical psychologist practicing in the Chicagoland area, with a focus on the treatment of trauma and sexual abuse. She is a recent Fellow of the Jungian Psychotherapy Program (2018–2020) and graduate of the Jungian Studies Program (2014–2016) at the C G Jung Institute of Chicago. Her current research is focused on collective psyche, application of Jung’s theories to the present cultural climate, and re-examining archetype and archetypal material, especially as it relates to the concept of the feminine, from a fourth-wave feminist standpoint.

Daniel Ross, RN, PMHNP has been a nurse for 40 years and in hospice for over 30. As a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, he brings both a medical and psychiatric experience to the field of end-of-life care. He is a Jungian Analyst at the C G Jung Institute of Chicago. Dan works in the field of Hospice and Palliative Care and is in private practice as a psychotherapist in Chicago.

Click here to learn more about the program and to register


This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law


Thank you to our 2019 Supporter level donors: Bill Alexy, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Circle Center Yoga, Arlo and Rena Compaan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Lorna Crowl, D. Scott Dayton, George J. Didier, Ramaa Krishnan/Full Bloomed Lotus, Suzanne G. Rosenthal, Deborah Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner. If you would like to support this podcast, click here to donate.

Adina Davidson | From the Sacred to the Banal: Can we Find a Way to Move Telehealth From the Banal to the Sacred?

This is part of a continuing series of posts from conversations with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


Lisa sent me a link to some long-term qualitative research being done by analysts who have been doing Teletherapy prior to the Covid 19 crisis. One of the issues they raised was whether Teletherapy brought an experience of banality into a sacred experience.

What makes our work sacred?

For me it is the times when I and my client or analysand experience the flow of healing that is beyond one ego talking to another ego. It seems that the connection or the field between the two of us opens a channel to something larger than either of us could have brought into the room. We experience the presence of the numinous. In Kabbalah or Jewish mystical tradition, this flow is called Shefa which can be translated as divine emanation or flow. Perhaps a analogous term more familiar in mainstream culture might be Grace.

In general, therapists and even analysts don’t talk a lot about this experience perhaps because it is so beyond our control but also because it is beyond language. By definition it is hard to talk about. At the same time, I would argue that without the presence of the numinous/Shefa/Grace there is no deep healing. With it there is sometimes change that seems miraculous or inexplicable.

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Adina Davidson | Plague and Ego Relativization

This is part of a a continuing series of posts from conversations with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


From Lisa, citing an episode of the podcast This Jungian Life:

The Quarantine/Stay-at-Home order is like the beginning of an alchemical transformation of the ego being broken down. It’s the beginning of a process of relativizing all our usual ego activities to something greater, fearful and not-fully-knowable.

As Jungians we tend to take a very optimistic view of the relativization of ego. We see it as a step in the path toward wholeness. Ego needs to see its proper (small) place in psyche in order for our conscious self to relate to the Self. This process of understanding our egoic limits is put into the context of growth and development.

I see this growth-oriented relativization of ego happening at times in myself and with my analysands even in this moment of uncertainty, fear and loss. I can sense (and my analysands report) moments of spaciousness and a larger peace that seems more available in all the time and quiet we have during quarantine.  I feel the important and valuable things – such as family conversations, the friendship of my life-partner, religious and secular ritual, creative work – in my bones. They strike my more-than-usually-open and vulnerable heart and easily bring me to tears. This can be framed as a solutio (the alchemical stage of dissolving a material into its constituent parts) process. Some of the ego defenses have been dissolved by the time-honored methods of being quiet and alone, terror and sadness. This dissolving opens space for an awareness of the larger realities.

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Adina Davidson | Two Jungians’ Thoughts from the Quarantine

These are some notes from a conversation with Lisa Maechling Debbeler, JD, MA, LPCC about the nature of being a therapist/analyst in a time of quarantine. We began talking on Saturday March 21, 2020 at the beginning of the shut down and are continuing to talk weekly. We were both continuing to work and trying to see as many of our clients/analysands as possible through Zoom or other virtual methods. We were both finding this both unexpectedly and expectedly difficult and wanted to share our experiences with colleagues and friends that we respect.


First, we both were finding that conducting therapy/analysis virtually was shockingly exhausting and so were almost all of our colleagues. We had certain expectations of our ability to be productive between clients and found that both of us were staring vaguely into space or aimlessly snacking rather than taking a note, making a phone call, doing some writing, eating lunch etc.  We were interested in whether there might be a Jungian perspective that might help inform our understanding if not help rectify it.

My initial stab was that we were missing the “field” that exists between analyst and analysand and is the container for much of the therapy. Not only in the sense of the quasi-mystical field of collective unconscious and synchronicity but in the simple physiological data that we gather about each other unconsciously. The micro shifts in facial expression, the half-heard sighs or in breaths, the subtle changes in body language. All of this is missing or limited when we view each other through a computer screen. Our conscious egoic self must carry all the burden of the communication with no help from our instinctive or intuitive understanding of what the person is communicating non-verbally.

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Interview with Fanny Brewster

Fanny Brewster, PhD, MFA, LP , was scheduled to be the keynote speaker at this year’s Founders’ Day Symposium on March 21st. The event has since been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Fanny Brewster is a Jungian analyst, and a professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She is a writer of nonfiction including African Americans and Jungian Psychology: Leaving the Shadows (Routledge, 2017), Archetypal Grief: Slavery’s Legacy of Intergenerational Child Loss (Routledge, 2018) and The Racial Complex: A Jungian Perspective on Culture and Race (Routledge, 2019). Her poems have been published in Psychological Perspectives Journal where she was the Featured Poet. Dr. Brewster is an international lecturer and workshop presenter on Jungian related topics that address Culture, Diversity, and Creativity. She is a faculty member at the New York C. G. Jung Foundation and the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts.  

She is interviewed by Adina Davidson, PhD. Dr. Davidson is a Jungian Analyst in Cleveland, Ohio, member of the Chicago Society of Jungian Analysts, and recent graduate of our Analyst Training Program.


For more information about our Founders’ Day Symposium, click here.


This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited by Ben Law


Thank you to our 2019 Supporter level donors: Bill Alexy, Usha and Ashok Bedi, Circle Center Yoga, Arlo and Rena Compaan, Eric Cooper and Judith Cooper, Lorna Crowl, D. Scott Dayton, George J. Didier, The Kuhl Family Foundation, Ramaa Krishnan & Full Bloomed Lotus, Suzanne G. Rosenthal, Deborah Stutsman, Debra Tobin, Alexander Wayne and Lynne Copp, Gerald Weiner. If you would like to support this podcast, click here to donate.

Why Become a Jungian Psychoanalyst: An Interview with Adina Davidson & Dan Ross

Boris Matthews, PhD, LCSW, NCPsyA, the Director of Training at the C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago, interviews two Jungian Psychoanalysts and recent graduates of our Analyst Training Program (ATP), Adina Davidson, PhD, and Dan Ross, RN, PMHNP, MSN, MBA, about why they chose to commit to Jungian work and how it has change their practices.

The Analyst Training Program prepares experienced, licensed clinicians to become certified as Jungian psychoanalysts through an in-depth understanding of the theory and practice of analytical psychology grounded in personal analysis and clinical consultation.

The Process of Analytic Training is both educational and transformational, and frequently leads to significant personal development and psychological deepening. The program fosters mutual development and psychological awareness within an intimate learning community of candidates and analysts. Upon graduation, candidates have an appreciation of the symbolic attitude within the interactive field of analysis and a working understanding of transference dynamics within the analytic relationship.

The Curriculum is organized thematically around the reading of Jung’s seminal writings as well as subsequent developments in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis. Courses in theory and practice are likewise organized around major themes that include the structure and complexity of the psyche, the mythic patterns of archetypal potentials and dynamics, the capacity to work with the symbolic meaning of dreams, and a practical grasp of the mutual transformation of analyst and client within the interactive transferential field of analysis.  Case seminars, case colloquia, dream practica, and group process ground the thematic and course materials in personal and clinical experience. The curriculum extends over a four-year course of study taught on nine three-day weekends each year.

The Program is designed to make analytic training available to all qualified applicants. The one-weekend-a-month structure allows training to fit into one’s professional life, whether or not you live in the Chicago area. Our location in “the loop” has convenient access to public transportation, both O’Hare and Midway airports, and Union Metra/Amtrak train station. We have discount rates at Club Quarters Hotel and tuition assistance is available to those in financial need. All classes and events are accessible.

Certification of the C.G. Jung Institute to train analysts is granted by The International Association of Analytical Psychology. The Institute is accredited as a psychoanalytic training institute by the The American Board for Accreditation in Psychoanalysis, Inc.

Applications to the Analyst Training Program are currently being accepted for the 2020-2021 training year. The deadline to apply is January 15th, 2020. To learn more about the program, the institute, and to download an application, visit our website.

Links
Analyst Training Program
Our Training Programs
Virtual Tour of the Institute

Support Us: Visit Our StoreMake a Donation


This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share it, but please do not change it, sell it, or transcribe it.
Music by Michael Chapman
Edited and produced by Benjamin Law

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The Jungianthology Podcast offers free lectures from our archives and interviews with Jungian analysts and presenters at Institute programs.

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